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Cherry, Cherry by Neil Diamond

Album: The Feel Of Neil DiamondReleased: 1966Charted:
6
  • Neil Diamond is the only credited songwriter on this track, but he got some help from Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, who worked with him after he signed with Bang Records and produced the song. Barry and Greenwich were part of the Brill Building songwriting community, and had written many major hits, including "Be My Baby" and "Chapel Of Love." They mentored Diamond early in his career and helped him create this Pop nugget, which helped make him a star.
  • This started out with a guitar lick Diamond came up with that caught Barry's ear. He and Greenwich loved it and encouraged Neil to finish the song.
  • In an interview with Melody Maker, Jeff Barry said that this song was originally "Money, Money," but that he and Bang records owner Bert Berns convinced Diamond to make it lighter and more teen-friendly. They were on to something with the original title: In 1968, Tommy James & the Shondells released Mony Mony.
  • Ever notice that there are no drums in this song? That's because the version you hear was intended as a demo, with hand claps providing the drum beat. Diamond recorded the demo with Barry and Greenwich on backing vocals and Artie Butler on piano and Hammond organ. When they recorded the song in an official session complete with horns and drums, they couldn't capture the exuberance of the demo. The drum and horn version was included on Diamond's 1996 anthology In My Lifetime.
  • When this became a hit, Diamond's songs were in demand. This led to The Monkees recording of Diamond's "I'm A Believer," which was the biggest hit of 1967. (thanks to David Wild, author of He Is...I Say: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Neil Diamond, for all above)
  • Ellie Greenwich was not just a premier league songwriter, she was a fine backing singer too and she and Jeff Barry often did the backing vocals for the songs they wrote. Neil Diamond recalled to Rolling Stone her contribution to this song: "Ellie was the best background singer ever. She did all the background parts on my early Bang records, 'Cherry Cherry,' 'She Got the Way to Move Me,' 'Kentucky Woman' - all of those records were Jeff and Ellie. They just had this great knack of singing all kinds of background parts and they were great at it. She invented the background parts to 'Cherry Cherry.'"
  • Diamond made his TV debut performing this song on American Bandstand in 1966. Said Diamond, "American Bandstand was the holy grail of television shows for any Rock and Roll artist at that time."
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Comments: 8

On March 11th 1973, "Cherry, Cherry" (live version) by Neil Diamond entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #84; and on April 29th it peaked at #31 (for 2 weeks) and spent 10 weeks on the Top 100...
Seven years earlier on August 14th, 1966 the original studio version of the song entered the Top 100 at position #88 and reached #6 (for 1 week) on October 9th and stayed on the Top 100 for 12 weeks...
The live version was track six on side one from his 'Hot August Night' album (the album peaked at #5 on Billboard's Top 200 Albums chart)...
Mr. Neil Leslie Diamond celebrated his 73rd birthday two months ago on January 24th (2014).
Barry - Sauquoit, Ny
I've known this song for a long time, but I haven't noticed something about it that I've just noticed, but now I wonder. Was this song partially about sex? I mean the chorus "she got the way to move it Cherry" could refer to her dancing but they could also refer to something else. but it's the Line "I love the way you do me" that really struck a chord with me recently. It sounds like the line is blatantly a sexual innuendo, but I don't know for sure. It certainly couldn't have been "I love the way you do my hair" or taxes, but who knows..Sam Williams - Sherman Oaks, Ca
My all-time favorite of his. The lack of drums and Greenwich's eerie background vocals make it one-of-a-kind.Esskayess - Dallas, Tx
Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich DID not co-write this song. They encouraged Neil and helped him get started as an artist but they don't have a writing credit on Cherry, Cherry. Barry and Greenwich produced the record and Neil has said that Ellie came up with the "we've got the way to move you cherry" on the handclapsCoy - Palestine, Tx
When originally released in 1966 it peaked at #6, and then was re-released seven years later in 1973 and peaked at #31!!!Barry - Sauquoit, Ny
Ellie Greenwich died on August 26 2009, Neil Diamond not only lost a talented songwriter and background singer but also a wonderful friend. R.I.P. Ellie and thanks for music.Teresa - Mechelen, Belgium
Don, you forgot about something else by Neil Diamond: "Thank the Lord For the Night Time". Its similarity to "Cherry, Cherry" was probably intentional, for they're by the same artist. As for "What I Like About You" by the Ramones, I have no idea how intentional, if at all. The most subtle similarity I know is a note collection in both "I Go Crazy" by Paul Davis & "Babe" by Styx.Drew - B\'ham, Al
I always get a kick out of it when two very different songs nevertheless have a similar line, rhythm, or chord progression. I started playing The Ramones' "What I Like About You" on the guitar, and my brother started singing "Cherry, Cherry." Good music is good music, whatever the context.Don - Phoenix, Az