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September

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DAUGHTRY



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This hushed ballad is the seventh track on American rock band Daughtry's second album, Leave This Town. Chris Daughtry penned it with guitarist Josh Steely.
The album's title comes from a line in this song, which draws on the singer's experiences growing up with his brother in the tiny North Carolina town of Lasker. Daughtry told Associated Content: "There's a line in the song that says we knew we had to leave this town, which stems from my childhood. I knew in order to do anything big with my life I would have to leave that town that I was in. It probably had a population of 100 or so."
Chris Daughtry explained in publicity materials that much of Leave This Town explores the different paths we take in our search for transcendence. Said Daughtry: "A lot of it is about how leaps of faith can set us free or tie us down, and how we often find heartache when we run from something and redemption when we run toward something."
Leave This Town debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200. As Daughtry's self-titled debut album also topped the chart, they became the third group in the 21st century to arrive with a pair of #1s. Co-incidentally the other two acts before Daughtry to achieve this feat this century also start off with the letter "D." D12, featuring Eminem, and Danity Kane are the "D"s who'd previously done the debut double.
The bittersweet ballad's music video features Chris Daughtry playing live and looking back at his past with bandmates bassist Josh Paul, drummer Robin Diaz, and guitarists Brian Craddock and Josh Steely. The clip was shot July 1, 2010 at the Stevens Center of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts in Winston Salem, North Carolina.
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