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Someday, We'll Be Together

by

The Supremes



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This was a remake of a song originally recorded by the duo Johnny & Jackey (Johnny Bristol and Jackey Beavers) in 1961. Motown Records brought in Bristol to produce a new version of the song for Jr. Walker & the All-Stars, but Motown chief Berry Gordy decided to give it to Diana Ross as her first solo single away from The Supremes. Bristol struggled to get the sound he wanted from Ross, and encouraged her along the way, which made it onto tape: That's him coaching Diana through the song, offering "Sing it pretty" and "You better" along the way.
Motown decided to release this as by "Diana Ross and the Supremes," even though Ross was the only member of the group whose voice is on the recording - the backing vocals are by session artists. The next song Ross recorded, which was "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)," became her first solo single.
Janet Jackson sampled this on her 1993 hit single "If."
The Supremes
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Comments (9):

On December 21st 1969 Diana Ross & the Supremes performed "Someday We'll Be Together" on the CBS-TV program 'The Ed Sullivan Show'...
And on that very same day is reached #1 (for 1 week) on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; it had entered the chart on November 2nd and spent 16 weeks on the Top 100...
On December 7th it reached #1 (for 4 weeks) on Billboard's Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart...
And on the same show the trio also performed a medley of ten of their #1 records.
- Barry, Sauquoit, NY
Diana Ross's voice is so sultry, so sublime in this tune, sexy and a little breathless. The song really captured that moment in time as well as the emotion of it; she was going out on her own. Tho she sings "I made a big mistake" she doesn't really sound too sad about it, does she? I think that's why the song works so well.
- Camille, Toronto, OH
...Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong are not on the recording...it's back-up singers.
Miss Ross and her monumental ego flashes forward.
They were my favorite group as a kid.

God bless Florence Ballard.
- John, Hamlin, NY
It was rumored that if this song did not reach #1, then the tune "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" would have been the final release under the name Diana Ross and the Supremes.
- Kristin, Bessemer, AL
During the "Motown 25: Yesterday, Today and Forever" special on NBC in 1983, the highlight of the show was to have been the reunion of Diana Ross along with Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong - Diana Ross was already recording with RCA and Wilson and Birdsong were all but forgotten at Motown at the time - the performance only lasted a few minutes, and from the looks of it, it was not well choreographed or arranged.
- Kristin, Bessemer, AL
It was rumored that if this song did not reach #1, then the tune "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" would have been the final release under the name Diana Ross and the Supremes.
- Kristin, Bessemer, AL
This song was played at Florence Ballard's funeral although she was no longer a Supreme when Diana Ross recorded this song with session singers.
- Tony, Charleston, SC
Oh, I'm shocked to find this is Diana only. I always thought it was all of them. It's such a perfect song. Kind of ironic, since it's their "swan song" called Someday We'll Be Together." Hmm, kinda reminds me of John & Paul doing "Ballad of John & Yoko."
- Guy, Woodinville, WA
This was the last Billboard No. 1 song of the 1960s.
- Nate, Newport News, VA
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