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Rock A Doodle Doo

by

Linda Lewis



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Linda Lewis is one of those enormous musical talents who prove that the public can be dumb as well as fickle. In spite of her obvious talents as a songwriter coupled with a five octave vocal range, she managed to achieve little more than a cult following in a career spanning four decades.
Released in 1973, "Rock-A-Doodle-Doo" or "Rock A Doodle Doo" was about as good as things got for her singles-wise. Although not her first release, it was her first self-penned single. Backed by "Reach for The Truth" it was produced by the lady herself and her future first husband, Jim Cregan.
A fair effort, it might be described as a girly love song. In March 2007, when she appeared on a South of England radio station, the host pointed out that the first line contained a mondegreen of which she had previously been unaware. A listener from Doncaster had phoned in and said "When you come out of school" sounded like "When you come out Tesco".
This is not the case on the live version which was recorded in Japan; this somewhat superior take contains a decent lead guitar solo.
The original runs to around 3 minutes 23 seconds and was released on Raft, but a promotional copy "NOT FOR SALE" was put out by Reprise, apparently with a different B Side: "Sideway Shuffle" and "Play Around". (thanks, Alexander Baron - London, England)
Linda Lewis
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Comments (1):

Linda sang backing vocals on Bowie's "Aladdin Sane" album...
- Zabadak, London, England
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