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Worst That Could Happen

by

Brooklyn Bridge



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This song was written by Jimmy Webb and originally recorded by The 5th Dimension on their 1968 Magic Garden album. Like "MacArthur Park" and "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," Webb wrote the song about a love affair that he had with Linda Ronstadt's cousin, Susan Rondstadt. And yes, she married someone else in real life.
When Johnny Maestro (former lead singer of the Crests) put together an 11-piece band, his managers complained that it would be easier to sell the Brooklyn Bridge than to promote such a large ensemble. The name stuck.
After the group recorded two songs assigned to them by Buddha Records and were less than amused with the results, Maestro was rummaging through his LP collection when he spotted this song on The 5th Dimension's Magic Garden album.
Brooklyn Bridge
More Brooklyn Bridge songs
More songs written by Jimmy Webb

Comments (11):

On January 26th 1969, "Worst That Could Happen" by the Brooklyn Bridge peaked at #3 (for 2 weeks) on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart...
The two weeks it was at #3 the records at #1 and #2 remained the same for both those weeks; #1 was "Crimson and Clover" by Tommy James and the Shondells and #2 was "Everyday People" by Sly and the Family Stone.
- Barry, Sauquoit, NY
On December 21st 1968 "Worst That Could Happen" by Johnny Maestro & the Brooklyn Bridge entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; and on January 26th, 1969 it peaked at #3 (for 2 weeks) and spent 12 weeks on the Top 100...
Lead singer Johnny Maestro is a dual member of the Vocal Group Hall of Fame; first with the Crests in 2004 and with the Brooklyn Bridge in 2005...
R.I.P. Mr. Maestro, born John Mastrangelo, 1939 - 2010.
- Barry, Sauquoit, NY
This song is noted for the quoting from Mendelssohn's "Wedding March" from "A Midsummer's Nights Dream", heard at the conclusion of the song. In the 5th Dimension version, The March is heard in the electric organ, while in the Brooklyn Bridge version, the March is quoted by a handful of trumpets.
- Jordan, Los Angeles, CA
Always one of the best ever,heard it first in Nam '69. What a beautiful song and awesome job by Johnny. Like to think it got me through a lot...RIP Johnny.
- Art, Minneapolis, MN
I love this song, but I always thought it was funny that the guy was saying that her marrying someone else was the worst that could happen, well, you know, other than actually marrying you myself!
- Nick, Grand Prairie,
This is a song with lyrics that had real life meaning to it. The emotional tug it had on your heart. The easy to remember lyrics gives it a quality and format that is easy to sing over and over again when you want to feel unselfish for the greater good of someone else. A true shame the brooklyn bridge didn't have a longer life span.
- TOM, SPRINGFIELD, OH
I first saw Brooklyn Bridge when I visited my good friend Danny Fawcett from Kokomo, Indiana in 1969 at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana. He was his fraternity's president and set me up with a date for the evening. I don't remember anything about the girl, but I do remember the 11 piece band and how great Johnny Maestro sang!
- Stormy, Kokomo, IN
The Brooklyn Bridge version starts out "Girl, I heard you're getting married" and continues on in that fashion, slightly different than the lyrics listed here. The song rocks, but the true clincher comes towards the end when the horns very dramatically hit the first few notes of the "Wedding March" as the singer passionately laments losing this woman to another. Fabulous.
- Camille, Toronto, OH
Jimmy Webb recorded his own intensely personal version of this fine song. It appears on the CD "Ten Easy Pieces." I much prefer it to the hit version by the Brooklyn Bridge. So does my wife. We were driving through a lonely expanse of Wyoming about a year ago and I put it on the CD player. Now, my wife is not an overly sentimental or emotional person. But I looked over at her partway through the song and saw her wiping away tears. I had never seen her react that way to a song before.
- Kevin, Syracuse, UT
The original version was recorded by The Fifth Dimension but it wasn't a hit. The song appeared on an album as a medley with Wedding Bell Blues.
- Howard, St. Louis Park, MN
The Brooklyn Bridge was the joining of two established groups, the Del-Satins and the Rhythm Heritage. At the time, Maestro was fronting the Del-Satins which included Fred Ferrara and Les Cauchi. There were no recordings issued by the then trio, who had only been performing together as such for a matter of months before the Bridge was built.
- Fred, Summit, NE
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