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Where Have All the Good Times Gone

by

The Kinks



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

"Where Have All the Good Times Gone" was written by Kinks' frontman Ray Davies for their fifth studio album. It was originally released on a single as the B-side of "Till the End of the Day," but gained status as an A-side after David Bowie covered it for his album Pin-Ups.
Listening to the lyrics, one is reminded how The Kinks were experiencing some inner-band tension around this time, punctuated by incidents such as the onstage fight at The Capitol Theatre in Cardiff, Wales. Ray Davies insulted drummer Mick Avory and kicked over his drums, Avory responded by clocking Davies with a hi-hat, knocking him cold and requiring stitches. This led to their brief ban from touring America. So of course Davies might have been feeling down in the dumps. In fact, the very album title is a joking reference to the "bad reputation" that the band had gotten, in part stemming from incidents such as the stage fight.
Van Halen covered this song on the album Diver Down. This was the second case of Van Halen covering The Kinks; the first was 1978's "You Really Got Me."
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