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Trains And Boats And Planes

by

Dionne Warwick



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This mournful ballad was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David at their creative peak. After being turned down by Gene Pitney, it was recorded in quick succession by Anita Harris and Billy J. Kramer & The Dakotas (both 1965), and the following year by Dionne Warwick. The Harris recording, on Pye, was backed by "Upside Down". The song has also been covered by Sandie Shaw (1969).
According to Dominic Salerno in Burt Bacharach, Song By Song..., it was first recorded by Bacharach himself (with orchestra and chorus) on the Kapp label as the B Side of "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" (no, not that "Don't Go Breaking My Heart"); it was released in May 1965.

Of the song itself, Salerno says its travel motif "seemed to fit Bacharach's new jet-setting pace, as he began to spend most of his time in Europe - working, living with his new wife Angie Dickinson, conducting concerts with Marlene Dietrich and recording in England".
The distorted electric piano that opens the Dionne Warwick version may sound like Ray Charles on "What'd I Say" but this is coincidental, and "one consequence of working in English recording studios, which Bacharach considered sub-standard". Indeed! (thanks, Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 3)
Dionne Warwick
Dionne Warwick Artistfacts
More Dionne Warwick songs
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More songs written by Burt Bacharach and/or Hal David

Comments (1):

This is my favorite David/Bacharach song. What incredible songwriting! As usual, Dionne Warwicks version is the best.
- Glenn, Simi Valley, CA
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