Browse by Title
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z #  




Copperline

by

James Taylor



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Copperline is an area near Chapel Hill in North Carolina where James Taylor grew up, and the song is a nostalgic look back at his childhood, complete with a mention of his dog, Hercules. Taylor visited Copperline before he wrote the song, and discovered that pre-fabricated homes had popped up in the area, destroying it's charm. He sings about this in the lyrics, "I tried to go back, as if I could, all spec houses and plywood, tore up and tore up good."
Morgan Creek, which Taylor mentions in the song, is on Morgan Creek Road, where Taylor's childhood home was located. In 2003, the Morgan Creek Bridge was renamed the "James Taylor Bridge" in a ceremony celebrating the singer.
Taylor wrote this song with Reynolds Price, who was a professor of English at Duke University, and also a playwright, author and lyricist. Taylor met Price when he worked on the score for a 1982 PBS production of a play Price wrote, and the two became friends. The two wrote Copperline when Price was visiting Taylor's home in Connecticut. Price died on January 20, 2011 at age 77.
James Taylor
James Taylor Artistfacts
More James Taylor songs
More songs with places in the title
More songs about looking back on fond memories
More songs about childhood

Comments (2):

Great song and maybe another lyric in Sandy's comments. The farms and ranches of our childhood are all covered with asphalt and concrete now.
- FrankD, Reseda, CA
One of my all-time faves. How cool that JT wrote an evocative song about something so many of us feel, but never gets said. How many people re-visit their childhood home, only to find it "tore up, tore up good?" Ah, progress in America! More shopping malls, more subdivisions, more roads, more 7-11s, more of everything but less open space, less childhood play, less water, less woods, less peace, less quiet. All in the name of "growth." Which simply means, political greed.
- sandy, Enterprise, FL
You have to to post comments.
Bob DaisleyBob Daisley
Bob was the bass player and lyricist for the first two Ozzy Osbourne albums. Here's how he wrote songs like "Crazy Train" and "Mr. Crowley" with Ozzy and Randy Rhoads.
Francesca BattistelliFrancesca Battistelli
The 2011 Artist of the Year at the Dove Awards isn't your typical gospel diva, and she thinks that's a good thing.
Narada Michael Walden - "Freeway of Love"Narada Michael Walden - "Freeway of Love"
As a songwriter and producer, Narada had hits with Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey and Starship. But what song does he feel had the greatest impact on his career?
Amy GrantAmy Grant
The top Contemporary Christian artist of all time on song inspirations and what she learned from Johnny Carson.