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Carolyn

by

Black Veil Brides



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This track from Post hardcore glam metal band Black Veil Brides' debut album We Stitch These Wounds was inspired by the health problems the mother of guitarist Jake Pitts has gone through. Frontman Andy Biersack explained to Artist Direct: "It's the first song that I ever wrote lyrically from someone else's perspective. It's about Jake's mother who has struggled with illness and how he felt. When you find out that someone's sick, there's nothing you can really do except say that you're there and you're going to try to help or do whatever you can. At the end of the day, you can't really cure someone if they're sick. I took Jake's story and tried to put my own perspective on it. Like anything in life, if there's a situation where you see something terrible is happening and you can't necessarily stop it, the least you can do is promise you're going to be there for the person who's being affected by it."
Black Veil Brides
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Comments (1):

i love andy and bvb there an amazing band soo
- tyra, fortville , IN
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