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The Gates of Delirium

by

Yes



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Running 21:55, this was a band composition, credit to Jon Anderson, Steve Howe, Patrick Moraz, Chris Squire and Alan White. Anderson wrote the lyrics to go along with the music. The song describe a battle, with a prelude, a charge, a moment of victory, and a peace. "It's not to explain war or denounce it really," he said. "It's an emotional description with the slight feeling at the end of, 'Do we have to go through this forever?"
The song was written with live performance in mind - the band admits that it didn't translate all that well to a recording. In our interview with Jon Anderson, he mentioned it as one of his favorites to play live, and explained: "The record company didn't know what to do with it, but we did, because we were performing it on stage and that was our legacy, to be able to go on stage and perform this music that would never be heard on radio."
A variety of homemade sound effects were used on this song, which is something their keyboard player Patrick Moraz encouraged, as it was something he did with his band Refugee. According to drummer Alan White, many of the sounds were made with items they picked up at a junkyard.
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