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How Many More Times

by

Led Zeppelin



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This is based on some old Blues songs that influenced the band. Some of the lyrics are from Blues singer Albert King's song "The Hunter," and much of the song was derived from Howlin' Wolf's "How Many More Years." Some other Led Zeppelin reworkings of Blues songs include "You Shook Me" and "The Lemon Song."
The writing credit on this song went to Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and John Bonham - everyone in the band except Robert Plant, who didn't get a writing credit for any songs on the Led Zeppelin album, although he did help put this one together. The arrangement of old blues songs was something he'd done with his former band, Hobbstweedle. (thanks, Andy - Indiana, PA)
This was the last song on the first Led Zeppelin album. It was listed as 3:30 on the album, but the correct length is 8:28. The reason that the song was listed as only being a little over 3 minutes was to promote radio play. Jimmy Page knew that radio would never play a song over 8 minutes long, so he wrote the track time as shorter on the album to trick radio stations into playing it.
Led Zeppelin used this to close many of their early concerts. During the instrumental section, Plant would often thank the audience and showcase the other band members.
Robert Plant contributed the line, "I got another child on the way, that makes eleven." It referred to his unborn child, Carmen, who was born a month or two after Zeppelin recorded this album. (thanks, Adrian - Wilmington, DE)
This is one of three songs where Jimmy Page played his guitar with a violin bow. The others are "Dazed And Confused" and "In The Light." Jimmy's bowing can be heard in the section after his double-tracked guitar solo ("I was a young man, I couldn't resist...").
Talking about this song in the BBC book The Guitar Greats, Jimmy Page said: "We had numbers from the Yardbirds that we called free form, like 'Smokestack Lightnin',' where I'd come up with my own riffs and things, and obviously I wasn't going to throw all that away, as they hadn't been recorded, so I remodelled those riffs and used them again, so the bowing on 'How Many More Times' and 'Good Times, Bad Times' was an extension of what I'd been working on with the Yardbirds, although I'd never had that much chance to go to town with it, and to see how far one could stretch the bowing technique on record, and obviously for anyone who saw the band, it became quite a little showpiece in itself."
At the end of the song, the sound pans between the left and right channels.
Led Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin Artistfacts
More Led Zeppelin songs
More songs that were adapted from early Blues songs

Comments (52):

Kick ass riff to a kick ass song. The solo kicks major ass.
- Thomas, Roswell, NM
ain't no need to hide; ain't no need to run
cause i've got you in the sites of my... gun
- Michelle, McDonough, GA
What made the 60-70s so special was that we were living this music as part of a great cultural revolution in the world - where the younger generation was clashing with the old value system for both good and bad on both sides. What made it cool was the fact that our parents often hated this music we listened too, and there really was a generation gap. It felt cool to make a statement. And you can't do that so much anymore, because the culture is now immersed in the counter culture. Your grandpa is ME, and I'm more hip than my grandkids are. All five of them.
- Jonathan, Everywhere, NC
Actually, the line about "one more that makes eleven" was a line Robert added on his own that makes reference (at the time) to his soon-to-be-born daughter, Carmen. And I wonder what Plant's children are doing now. I guess I'll have to look it up.
- Jonathan, Everywhere, NC
How many more times by Led Zeppelin is a blatant copy of Howlin Wolf's 'How Many More Years' and Fleetwood Mac's 'No Place to Go' (credited to Howlin Wolf as Chester Burnett).

Couldn't believe it. I love Led Zep's How Many More Times, but was incredulous when I heard Mac's version and saw that Led Zep's version is credited to 'Page, Bonham and Plant'. Bollocks.
- Euan Dyer, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Texas International Pop Festiva,l Dallas 8-31-1969,I was lucky enough to get my grubby little Led Zeppelin lovin' hands on this bootleg almost 10yrs.I have a small bootleg collection....very small compared to others.If you can get your hands on this one you will love it.This song is so good live.Pagey is smokin on this one.The line "ring pearls ring pearls" where Jimmy copies Robert's vocal on guitar are right on and gives me the chills.By far my fav bootleg. JIMMY PAGE KICKS BUTT ON THIS ONE ,Robert so sultry and blusey.The name of the bootleg is" Zeppelin plays pure blues" A true tittle well earned. BTW on intro on the cd and close the band are introduced as THE Led Zeppelin funny huh.
- lisa, blountville , TN
"Killing Floor" is *definitely* a Howlin' Wolf original, written by Chester Arthur Burnett himself, which is the song "The Lemon Song" was based off of.
- Roy, Granbania, MA
This was played live regularly from 1968-1970 and again early in 1975 after Page broke his finger in an accident. It was very rarely played live in between.
- Peter Griffin, Quahog, RI
The BBC Sessions version features the infamous Squeeze My Lemon line.
- Peter Griffin, Quahog, RI
By the way, adding onto the 3:30 listed time on the album-at that approximate point in the song, there is a fake ending. What a good plan, isn't it?
- Peter Griffin, Quahog, RI
Hard to believe this song was left off the "Remaster" set--IMO it's the epitome of the early Led years: hard-driving creative adaptations of the basic blues (LZ was the best ever at re-doing the blues)

EDDIE, Rome GA
- Eddie, Rome, GA
Hey Peter, from RI. "Robert Anthony" is a self reference by Robert [Anthony] Plant.
- Matt, Poci, ID
Nice Guitar distortion in the begining
- Bill, Topeka, KS
This song mentions someone named Robert Anthony. What I want to know is: Who is Robert Anthony?
- Peter Griffin, Quahog, RI
I first heard this song on a soundtrack to the forgettable movie "Homer".
- Lalah, Wasilla, AK
It's a really great song!!!
- Ivana, -, Czech Republic
Some people are saying that parts of this song are taken from 'Beck's Bolero' like Jeff Beck wrote it, Page did actually write that song so he can't exactly steal it. Plus Bolero is a traditional rhythm.
- Matt, London, England
the opening guitar riff sounds a lot simular to the yardbirds song "smokestack lighning"
jimmy page havin beent he lead guitarist for the yardbirds may have got some riff ideas from "smokestack lightning"

who cares if they copied the lemon song and you shook me .........they made the songs twice as good to the original artist
- shane, perth, WA
The version on the DVD is one of my favourite live performances ever. I love the guitar playing by Jimmy.
- Ameer, LA, CA
fuken great song
nothin can beat led zeppelins style and electricity
- shane, perth, WA
kyle from california, the yardbirds song you are referring to is "Smokestack Lightning".
- Ryan, Lakewood, OH
They didn't rip off every song they did? The only one that got them in trouble is "Whole Lotta Love."
- Stefanie, Rock Hill, SC
oh god,another zeppelin rip off song?and this was one of my favorite songs!is there a song they made that wasent a rip off?good loud band with no vision pass me the abbey road album or dark side album!
- jerry619, san diego, United States
yeah its sad that john paul jones was so underrated he was totally awesome too.
- Jeanette, Irvine, CA
yeah mark your right i think he should have been more active and gotten himself some more attention that he deserved
- spencer, richmond, VA
I liked zeppelin in their early years like when this came out, after that john paul jones just looked like he was bored on stage.
- Mark, Ann Arbor, MI
Ya steve your right (check the extras for the how the west waw one DVD)
- Tom, Dosen't Matter, CT
I'm not sure but it sounds like Jimmy also uses a violin bow on this song.
- Steve, oroville, CA
the solo is actually from a jeff beck song and i do think its from becks bolero but just slowed to a crawl. lyrics are from howlin wolf and the bass line is from a yard birds tune. john bonham is the best drummer in the world, you can see emotion over technique which is rare. its not all about time signatures. its about playin the F*%&in drums.
- Kyle, Redding, CA
He didn't really Jeanette. That line about one more making eleven, was just an imporvised one. Plant made that up.
- Stefanie, Rock Hill, SC
Danny, I completely agree.
- Ryan, Havasu, AZ
wow jim if u think the intro's jazzy, u obviously don't know anything about jazz..great song though nonetheless, great for bands to jam out to for 10 minutes plus!
- Ben, Chinatown
The Riff is from the Yardbirds version of "Smokestack Lightning" when they played BBC Sessions, it was the bassline though, and it sounds alot better on this.
- Marlon, NYC, NY
Zeppelin at their best....The Blues never sounded better.
- Marlon, NYC, NY
I love the main riff, so simple, yet so awsome. And Bonzo's drums near the end, words can't describe.
- Danny, Sydney, Australia
The Kieth Moon reference is part of a story that goes something like this; After the Yardbirds broke up, with a US tour already scheduled, Jimmy Page had decided to reform the band. The line-up was set with Robert Plant being asked to join the band (Plant didn't really want to play with a bunch of old guys). When asked what he planned to call the new band Page mentioned he would probably just call it the "New Yardbirds". Someone replied that the New Yardbirds would go over like a lead balloon, Kieth Moon, thinking even less of the idea, suggested that it would go over like a lead zeppilin!
- Paul, minneapolis, MN
This song can inspire ANYONE to start a band. Especially with the jazzy intro and the middle section.
- Jim, Oxnard, CA
or as i like to call 'em GOD(s)
- nick, baton rouge, LA
I once heard an early live version of this. It was recorded after Led Zep made the album. They start playing the intro (which is awesome) and Plant started to introduce the band. Right after he introduces them, you can hear someone in the crowd yell "GET OFF THE STAGE!". If only they had known that they were in the presence of what would become a rock n' roll legend.
- Taylor, Austin, TX
I always heard that "The Lemon Song" was based on "Killing Floor," and that "Killing Floor" was by Howlin' Wolf, non Albert King.
- Stefanie magura, Rock Hill, SC
led zeppelin can do many types of songs, heavy/light, anything, and this is my favorite heavy song they did, i cant belive it didnt become as popular as "dazed", or STH
- nick, baton rouge, LA
"How Many More Years" was originally a Howlin' Wolf song that Albert King later covered. Also, Robert Plant received no writing credit at all on Led Zeppelin I because of contractual issues.
- Chris, Bluffton, SC
if you ever need inspiration to want to play rock n roll out and watch people's jaws drop, spin this tune
- colin k, sndy creek, OH
They played this awesome live on the Led Zeppelin DVD.
- Bartholemew, Cork, Ireland
the lemon song was actually based on an albert king song "killing floor", not a howling wolf song
- david, pasadena, CA
Early Fleetwood Mac (with Peter Green - Blue Horizon recordings) did a version of Chester Burnett's (Howlin' Wolf) "How many more years" strangely while being credited to Chester Burnett it was titled "No Place to go" This song was on Fleetwood Macs first album in 1967. It starts out with the line "How many more years have you got to wreck my life" but after saying this twice the rest of the song is sung as "How many more times, you gonna treat me like you do"
- Bret, Adelaide, Australia
On the Tribute to Sun Records concert in Montreux, Switzerland in 2001, Page and Plant played the original "How Many More Years", also as hommage to Howlin' Wolf.
- Ben, Hilversum, Netherlands
Oh, Rosie, oh, girl. [X2]
Steal away now, steal away
- Ivan, Buenos Aires, Argentina
This song rocks. They never play it on the radio. When you hear it you know its a Led Zep song. Great song to play pool and drink beer to.
There is this little bar in Rosarito Beach that has this album on it and when we roll into that place to kill some cervezas, I always play this song. ((Todos Santos Rules)))!!!
- Jeff, San Diego, CA
doesn't Danzig use these lyrics on the song Hunter off the danzig lp? ceg24@cox.net
let me know someone
- Chris, las vegas, NV
The riff and lyrics are loosely based on Howlin' Wolf's "How Many More Years".
- James, Birmingham, AL
There has been used a small part from Beck's Bolero in the song. The song appeared on Jeff Beck's album Truth. It was recorded with Jimmy, Jeff, John Paul Jones and Keith Moon. They even thought about making a band at that point with Page, Beck, John Entwistle, Moon and Steve Winwood or Steve Marriot, calling themselves Led Zeppelin after a suggestion from either Entwistle or Moon.
- jefke, barcelona, Spain
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