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The Monster

by

Eminem



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This song finds Eminem reuniting with Rihanna. The Bajan superstar previously collaborated with Marshall Mathers when she sung the hook on his hit single "Love The Way You Lie" and its sequel, "Love The Way You Lie (Part II)." The pair also worked together on Rihanna's Unapologetic track, "Numb."
We hear Eminem attacking his internal demons on his verses whilst Rihanna embraces her inner monster on the hook. The song was written by the Detroit rapper with:

Visionary Music Group artist/producer Jon Bellion whose other credits include Jason DeRulo's Tattoos track, "Trumpets."

Staten Island native Bebe Rexha, whose first exposure in the music business came when she was chosen to be vocalist for Fall Out Boy bassist Pete Wentz's project, Black Cards. Her other writing credits include "Like A Champion," a track on Selena Gomez's Stars Dance album and Nikki Williams' #3 Dance Club Songs hit "Glowing."
The Folk-flavored, EDM-amplified production was supplied by New York-born DJ and producer Frequency who has also supplied beats for the likes of Snoop Dogg ("Think About It") and B.O.B. ("Chandelier").
Eminem starts off his first verse with a reference to his cover on the October 2000 edition of Newsweek magazine. "I wanted the fame but not the cover of Newsweek. Oh well, guess beggers can't be choosy," Slim Shady raps.
The song came out of a session with Frequency, another producer Alias, Bebe Rexha and Bellion. The latter started coming up with a song for Rexha to record. "Fast forward dude plays keys, hopped on the keys, started playing chords and I'm literally like, 'I'm friends with the monster,'" Bellion recalled to MTV News singing the words that Rihanna would eventually sing. "I just mumbled it."

The quartet continued writing and recording the song with Rexha in mind. "It was like a nice rhyme, so simple, so graspable. Fast forward 45 minutes she hopped in the booth, cut the hook that I wrote. She added some weird yodels on top of it," Bellion explained. "It was a full-blown song, it was like a Shakira four-to-the-floor type of record. The production was totally different."

Once the song was recorded Frequency, who had previously produced for Slaughterhouse, suggested that they offer the track up to their label, Eminem's Shady Records. "We were all like, 'Yeah that'll be crazy. That will be so dope if that happened,'" Bellion recalled. "I come back four days later to the studio and he's like, 'Yo, Atlantic wants the record, Shady wants the record, everybody wants the joint.'"
Rihanna originally referenced the song on Twitter in September 2013 saying she had just recorded, "A #monster hook for one of her favorite artists."
This song debuted at #1 on the UK singles chart, meaning that Rihanna became only the third artist following Elvis and The Beatles to top the listing seven times over seven years.
Running 4:11 at 110 beats per minute, this song starts with the chorus, then follows with three repetitions of verse-chorus-vocal break (Rihanna's "whaoa"s). There is no intro, bridge or pre-chorus in the song, which is common in Hip-Hop but not Pop.
The song's music video was directed by Rich Lee, who also worked with Eminem on "Not Afraid" and "Rap God." The clip kicks off with Rihanna as Eminem's shrink, a role that is in keeping with the mental illness related subject matter of the song's lyric. Doctor Rih-Rih observes the Detroit rapper as he travels back in time, revisiting famous moments from his career.
Eminem said that it wasn't just Rihanna's vocal gifts that persuaded him to link up with her again. "The perception of the record, what it's saying, I thought it would be a good idea to have her on it because I think people look at us like we're both a little nuts," he told MTV News' Sway. "That's one of the things that I was telling her in making the record: I think that people look at us a little crazy."

"As soon as I got the beat I just heard her on it," he added. "I wanted to make sure that I had it finished first to be able to present to her, but once I had the rhymes done, I sent it to her."

"I had to send it to her because schedules were conflicting and s--t like that. Plus, the record it was kinda pulled together at the last minute," Em continued. "I sent it to her, she laid the hook, sent it back. She smashed it like she does always. It's pretty incredible."
The song focuses on Eminem's ongoing struggles with fame, and his desire to live a normal life. "It was this thing where I want this attention for this music, but then I want to be able to go in public, and I want to be able to eat a f---ing sandwich and be left alone," Em admitted during an interview with BBC Radio 1 DJ Zane Lowe. "I've never been an attention seeker, and [rap] seems like a hell of a career choice [for me], but ... that's not why I do it, just to get attention. I don't like to go in public and walk around and be like 'Here I am.' It's not what I want."

"My dream was for, like, to be able, like to hear rappers that I looked up to on the radio and be like 'Yo, what if Jay Z, whoever, what if they heard of me? What if they thought I was dope?'" he continued. "That was where my mentality always was, so when it all went crazy, it was really hard to wrap my head around."
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