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Suedehead

by

Morrissey



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

The name "Suedehead" came from a book by British author Richard Allen about post-skinhead gangs. The lyrics do not appear to have much to do with the novel and Morrissey himself later described the song as being about the life he lived in his early teenage years around 1972.
Morrissey was a journalist for the Record Mirror before forming the Smiths with Johnny Marr in 1982. He went solo in 1988 and this was his first release as a solo artist. By 2004 he'd achieved 7 Top-10 singles in the UK. (thanks, Edward Pearce - Ashford, Kent, England, for above 2)
The band Suede got their name from this song.
Morrissey
More Morrissey songs
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Comments (3):

I always thought this song was about someone breaking up with someone else and then trying to be with that person again acting like nothing happened and being stubborn, when really the other person don't care anymore

I really like this song :)
- Mary, tampico, Mexico
This is one of those songs about a situation where you have to experience for yourself in order to appreciate. It's about dating someone who ultimatly likes you a lot more than you like them. They infringe on personal space and basicaly hang around too much. In this song the subject is so insecure that she (he-who knows!) had to break into the singer's diary. In true male fashion the singer writes off the relationship with the immortal words "It was a good lay." This beg's the million dollar question, how can a man who was sworn to celebacy write such a thing. Richard Blade, a DJ at KROQ in Los Angeles at the time asked Morriissey, and his repsonse was "That was a long time ago."
- Steve, Chino Hills, CA
Morrissey's second solo hit "Every Day Is Like Sunday" repeated "Suedehead"'s UK Top 10 success in 1988, but was totally different in style to its predecessor
- Dave, Cardiff, Wales
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