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Bad Company

by

Bad Company



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Lead singer Paul Rogers denied in a 2010 interview with Spinner the reports that the name of the band, title of the album, and hit single came from the 1972 critically acclaimed Jeff Bridges Western of the same name. Rogers stated that he's never even seen the movie.
The singer added that he decided to go with a song with same name as the band as, "I think because it had never really been done, as far as I knew. I thought it was interesting to come out as a brand-new band with its own theme song."
So, where did the name "Bad Company" come from? Says Rogers: "It came from my childhood days. I saw a book on Victorian morals. They showed this picture of this Victorian punk. He was dressed like a tough, with a top hat and the spats and vests and the watch in the pocket and the tails and all of that. But everything was raggy. The shoes were popped out of the soles, and the top of the hat was popped out. And the guy is leaning on the lamppost with a bottle in his hand and a pipe in his mouth, obviously a dodgy person. And you've got this little choirboy kind of guy - a little kid, actually - looking up to him. And underneath it said, 'Beware of bad company.'"
There are times when you need to leave the studio to find the right atmosphere for a vocal (see: "The Boxer"). To get the hunting sound on this track, Paul Rogers recorded his vocals in the still of the night in the middle of a field under the moonlight. "It took about three hours to set it up, with wires and lends and everything, but when the time came there it was, and we just did it in the one take," he said.
Rogers told Spinner: "I wrote the song with that Western feel - with an almost biblical, promise-land kind of lawless feel to it. The name backed it up in a lot of respects."
The American metal band Five Finger Death Punch covered this on their 2009 album, War is the Answer. The band's guitarist Zoltan Bathory explained to Metal Hammer: "It's one that we've played live from time to time but never really thought about recording, but we've had so many emails and messages from fans asking when we're going to record it that we thought we should give it a shot. I think it's really important when you cover a song that you try to make it your own rather than just playing the original, but it's definitely come out sounding like Five Finger Death Punch."
Bad Company
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Comments (12):

Five Finger Death Punch covered this song. It was used on the FX Original Series "Sons of Anarchy"
- Jax, Redwood, CA
Stephen King used this song in his book, The Dark Tower. I thought it was appropriate. Way cool song.
- dane, Green Cove Springs Fla., FL
I HIGHLY doubt that Paul Rodgers has said "I think because it had never really been done, as far as I knew." regarding the song and band name being the same... He had PROBABLY heard of Black Sabbath by the time Bad Company was founded!
- Jloost, Utrecht, Netherlands
Bad Company's first albums were produced by Swan Song Records, the vanity label that Atlantic set up for Led Zeppelin. Signing Bad Company was a real coup for such an unknown label.
- Willie, Scottsdale, AZ
It was used as a Promo/theme song for "The Young Riders" Tv series...which starred near-unknowns Josh Brolin, Stephen Baldwin and Melissa Leo (pre-Homicide).
- Marlene, Montreal, QC
Actually I believe Black Sabbath's First album and first song ("Black Sabbath") had the same name?
- Ralp, Sedona, AZ
I've always loved this song. It's one of the band's best. I loved that it was featured in an episode of "Supernatural". It worked really well with the episode. That show has awesome music.
- Nicole, Chicago, IL
This song ROCKS! Bad Company is a very underrated group and should get more recognition. Paul Rodgers has an amazing voice on this song
- Allison, a little ol' town in, MI
What is missing from this song is a four minute guitar solo to end it. Mick Ralphs may be the most underappreciated lead guitar player in rock. I've been a fan since the first Mott the Hoople album (You Really Got Me......as an instrumental and Rock and Roll Queen).

When Paul Rodgers left Bad Company, Mick went back to adding the ending guitar break in 'Ready for Love' the way he played it for Mott the Hoople.

And Mick sang 80% of Mott's best songs, Rodgers never gave Mick the opportunity to sing. On Mott's 'Ready for Love', Mick is the lead singer.

Bad Co. fans, check out Mott the Hoople's first 6 albums (excluding 'Wildlife), and you may appreciate the talents of Mick Ralphs.
- Lester, New York City, NY
They didn't list any Bad Co songs because VH1 is a sham. How any list of the 100 greatest rock songs of all time could not include a single Bad Company song is beyond me.
- Mark, Schererville, IN
- Mark, Schererville, IN
There's a lot of references to VH1's "lists" on this site. Why did they not mention any of Bad Company's songs on the "100 greatest rock songs"? A travesty.
- Jay, Atlanta, GA
I totally agree!! I think it's their best, of course personal preference. The piano is directly lifted from the film it's named after. If you think the song rocks, watch the movie!! It kicks ass! Ths song is a total tribute to the film, and for me, BB.
- Linda, San Diego, CA
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