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Silent Lucidity

by

Queensrÿche



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Written by Queensrÿche guitarist Chris DeGarmo (who left the band in 1998), this is a song that deals with a person having a lucid dream. A lucid dream happens when you are aware that you are dreaming, and can control parts of it. DeGarmo got the idea from a book called Creative Dreaming, which explains how to tap into your subconscious mind and make like Leonardo DiCaprio in Inception. DeGarmo told Metal Edge in 1990: "Dreams tend to recur. Very often you have the same images, and it's being used in therapy, to confront the image in your dream. In a lifetime the average person spends about 4 ½ years in a vivid hallucination of the subconscious. You're doing things like flying, walking through walls - it's so intense. People can experience incredible physical sensations during dreaming."
In our interview with Queensrÿche's lead singer Geoff Tate, he said: "I love that song. I think it's a beautiful, beautiful piece. And although I didn't write it, I had a lot to do with shaping the destiny of that track through my melodic contributions and the way I sang it, and also in the mixing of the song and that kind of thing.

It had a strange beginning. It started out as simply just acoustic guitar and voice. And it wasn't until we were almost finished with the record, just in the last week of working on the record, that we added all the other instrumentation to it.

In fact, our producer (Peter Collins) didn't really want to put it on the record because he didn't think it was that well-developed as an idea. He was actually putting his foot down at one point saying, "No, I think you should come up with another song. You only have so many songs for the record, I don't think you should put that on the record." I think it's a good idea that he said that because it inspired Chris DeGarmo and I to really buckle down and finish the song and actually make it into what it is."
A piece of classical music is incorporated into this song: Brahm's "Lullaby" can be heard starting at 5:26, played by a cello.
Queensrÿche has had a long and illustrious career, but this is their only song to crack the Hot 100 in America. They fared better on the UK charts, where they placed six songs in the Top-40.
Queensrÿche
Queensrÿche Artistfacts
More Queensrÿche songs
More songs inspired by dreams
More songs that use parts of Classical compositions

Comments (27):

In the early 2000s while promoting a show in Sao Paulo at a radio station they were asked to play this song, which is their best know song in Brazil, and had to be reminded of which song it was. After a short break they played the song and included it on the setlist for the show the next day.
- Fabio, Sao Paulo, Brazil
It's not grieving in a true sense. It's a parent dealing with a nightmare where someone died: "Your mind tricked you to feel the pain/Of someone close to you leaving the game/Of life". Then the parent opens the world of dreams and the concept of lucid dreams during the rest of the song.

Also, I had a friend who described this as "Comfortably Numb 2" and while Gilmuor would have done a the guitar solo with his signature tone, it is very reminiscent of Floyd. Queensrÿche had previouslyworked with a producer of Floyd in the past, James Guthrie, which is important to the Floyd sound, with tons of credits from his work with Floyd, starting with The Wall. I'm sure this, and that Floyd so greatly influenced prog rock, have something to do with the similarities. (Comfortably Numb 2 fits well, as Comfortably Numb dealt with dream like feelings from a fever, this is about dreams)
- Jackie, Blacksburg, VA
This song is very deep...It is a truly spiritual song. As with many songs, it can have different meanings to different people, but to me, it is not only about actual dreams, but about a loving presence that is there with you in life as you are dreaming, either literally or figuratively...And that is "watching over you" and "Gonna help you see it through" and "will protect you in the night" (which could be taken too as protecting you through the dark times in your life)...And then...my favorite lyric, "IF you open your mind for me, you won't rely on open eyes to see...." I love this...I love this...I love this... and always will...
- Rebekah, Seattle, WA
i agree the rhythem of this song makes me wanna cry
- Nataliah, San Antonio, WI
This song comforts me:)
- Jhuna, Dumaguete City, Philippines
I love this song, but, can anyone find the song "Empire"? Because I can't.
- Anthony, sullivan, OH
Well, Amy, from Dallas, TX... I find your comment very annoying considering the fact that everyone else who commented holds this song in a very high regard...including me. This song means a lot of things to a lot of different people, for a lot of different reasons. Obviously it doesn't mean crap to you, so maybe you should take your negative opinions elsewhere.
- Brad, St. Louis, MO
The song is about an adult who is comforting a child who has just lost a loved one. The adult is telling the child that he/she has just had a lucid dream, and was terrified of it. The adult goes on to tell the child to relax and let it happen. He/she does, and the adult asks, "How's that? Better, now?" The lucid dreaming is being taught to the child to help with the grieving process.
- Chris, Independence, MO
Does anyone else think that parts of this song sound like Alice Cooper's "Only Women Bleed"?
- Darwin, Ralston, NE
to me i see this song about someone dies and is telling you dont shut your life down im at peace with it and will always be there and watching over you my mother was murderd and it has helped me find peace any time i hear it..
- bob, detroit, BC
Lucid dreaming eh? A favorite passtime of mine. So why does everyone think of dead people when they hear this? A very mellow tune really. The Hellraiser quote breaks it up nicely.
- Greg, Dallas, TX
William, Streetsboro, from OH

You are wrong it's: (How is that better).

Full missing lyrics:

(Visualize your dreams write them into permanent form)
(If you consist in your efforts you will achieve dream control control)
(How is that better)
(Dream control dream control)
(Help me)
- mark, los angeles, CA
I saw the BUILDING EMPIRES TOUR 3 times in 1991/1992. This song is just the tip of the iceberg on what this band does. It is a SHAME their other songs didn't get radio play. Anyone who missed this tour don't know what they missed!!
- Tina, Paducah, KY
This kinda reminds me of Pink Floyd too Big Ed. This song is epic and so is Queensryche and this whole album.
- Nicholos, Farmville, VA
Also, to Christian: I absolutely freaked out when I heard it on Supernatural. It was like, "OH MY GOD, THAT'S QUEENSRYCHE! AND OH MY GOD, IT'S THAT SONG I LOVE!"
And to Michelle: Redundancy much? I'm not sure how a dead rock star could be alive. :|
- Sarah, Eastern Passage, NS
This song is so beautiful. Considering how much I enjoy lucid dreaming and metal music, this song carries a lot of meaning for me. I would love to dance to this song with someone I loved.
- Sarah, Eastern Passage, NS
really kool song i like it the music is awesome
- cristina, long beach, CA
when i got back from Dresert Storm i thought this was Pink Floyd. this is an an awesome song, it turned me on to Queensryche.
- Big Ed, Pulaski, TN
There is a sound clip in the middle of the song containing the line, "How we feeling here, better?" That line actually comes from Hellraiser, spoken by he doctor I believe towards the middle of the film.

I have always loved this song and when I watched the movie recently I about fell out of my skin.
- William, Streetsboro, OH
This too is probably one of my favorite songs. When I was 18 in 1992 this was my favorite song. I used to listen to it, over and over, for hours. This was a time where I was very down on myself and life and the song helped me get through the tough times.
- J_Bryon, Milladore/Monroe, WI
this is my favourite song. no matter how many times i hear it, i still get goosebumps in certain parts and i cry. it's a true classic.
- day, blue ridge mountains, VA
This song was played on the show Supernatural, episode "Heart" and god it fit so good in that ending scene! I fell in love with it instantly :P, and the show became more close to my heart than ever before :).
- Christian, Östersund, Sweden
i love this song this song reminds me of all the dead rockstars that died
- michelle, minesota, MN
I adore this song. But this song reminds me of Mother by Pink Floyd.
- amay, edison, NJ
I CRY WHEN I HEAR THIS SONG. IT REMINDS ME OF MY DAD WHO DIED 6 YEARS AGO. TODAY IS HIS BIRTHDAY.
6-12
- Tracy, ELDON, MO
I absolutely love this song. Everytime I hear the rhythm to it I cry. It has a very beautiful melody to it.
- Meredith, Asheboro, NC
I find this song very annoying for some reason..
- Amy, Dallas, TX
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