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Last Child

by

Aerosmith



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

A swaggering, Blues-fused tune, this was written by Aerosmith lead singer Steven Tyler and lead guitarist Brad Whitford. The lyrics contain many clever double-entendre lyrics from Tyler, and he breaks new ground by rhyming "Tallahassee" with "Sassafrasse." The song wasn't a hit, but remains a favorite among many Aerosmith fans. In concert, it was often a showcase song for Whitford. (thanks, Gordon - Lake Havasu City, AZ)
In the Aerosmith biography Walk This Way, Brad Whitford explained how this song came together: "After rehearsal one day, I played this riff and Steven yells, 'I love it!' and stared playing drums; he plays very different from Joey (Kramer) with a more jazzy approach, fun to work with. Joe (Perry) threw in a couple of chord changes, a D chord to an A, and then spiced up the chord a little."
This was one of the first songs written for Aerosmith's fourth album, Rocks. They hit it big with their previous album Toys in the Attic and the re-release of "Dream On," so they suddenly found themselves with a big budget and lots of record company support. The album was recorded in a mobile studio at a warehouse outside of Boston that they called "The Wherehouse." With plenty of money, there was also plenty of drugs, but Aerosmith were still very functional addicts at the time and remained creative and productive in making the album, something that didn't happen on their next effort, Draw the Line.
The banjo on this track was played by Paul Prestopino, a multi-instrumentalist who had played with the Folk group The Weavers. Aerosmith's producer Jack Douglas overdubbed Prestopino's part after the band recorded the song.
The lyrics are based on the life of the band at the time, and all the time they spent on the road. Part of it deals with the time on tour just before the band would come home ("Home sweet home..."). Some members of the band and crew had wives and girlfriends, so when a tour was coming to a close, they would refrain from sex (except oral) as a courtesy - they didn't want to bring a social disease home with them.
This song was used in the video game Guitar Hero 2, under the "Return of the Shred" section. To unlock it, play that section and do the encore on any difficulty above medium. (thanks, Matt - Labrador City, Canada)
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Comments (18):

Actually the "Last Child" solo is played by Brad on the album. You can tell its him. Its well known that
Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter played on some of their earlier stuff like "Train Kept a Rollin", but Whitford is the guy on "Last Child".
- Mark, Raleigh, NC
Excusez-moi. Not to take away from Brad's playing but let me assure you. He did not, I repeat, did not play the solo on the original album. That's a studio cat. But it's good, isn't it?
- Rockheadz, Scarsdale, NY
Love the solo in this one. Does anyone care to know who the hire gun was that wrote the lick? Can you say hush money?
- Randy C., Yonkers, NY
This song has a killer groove, not unlike the groove to Bowie's FAME. Check it out.
Fame came out in '75 so maybe subconsciously the Aerosmith lads borrowed the riff...or maybe not. That riff has been around for years.
GReat song, none-the-less.
- chris, missoula, MT
This is a great song. I really should put it on my iPod. It's mostly known to me and my dad as the song that rhymes talahasse and sassafrasse.
- Homer, Springfield, KY
tis song is beast but needs a real music video
- Alan, ROCK!!!!!!!!!!!, TX
The guitars are cool in this one but the snare drums that are stereo paned are really cool too. Check it out!
- Olala, Eskilstuna, Sweden
What do you mean, not a hit. This chart position was better than some great ones - Piano Man, Close The Door, and Aerosmith's own Sweet Emotion.
- Joe, Chicago, IL
Joe Perry and Brad Whitford are great, but they're definitely not the best duo ever. Duane Allman and Dickey Betts are miles ahed of any other duo. I'd also put each Rolling Stones duo ahead of them (Brian Jones/Keith Richards, Mick Taylor/Richards and Ron Wood/Richards) and any Eagles duo/trio ahead of them especially the Joe Walsh, Don Felder, Glenn Frey combo.
- Scott, Boston, MA
Brad and Joe were like Oxygen and Hydrogen. When separated they had unique elemental qualities but were invisible. Together, they became something greater than the sum of the parts. This is prbably THE greatest guitar duo of all time.
- TJ, South Jersey, NJ
this song i cool, especialy the solo
- greg, New york, NY
I like the dual-guitar soloing in the song "Heart's Done Time"
- Nick, Paramus, NJ
Ever since I first saw Aerosmith (1975, I was 10), I have noticed that there has been a conscious effort (even by the band themselves) to foster the notion that Joe is THE lead guitarist. The bottom line - They are both great, and Brad's more traditional, precise playing meshes great with Joe's wilder, more spontaneous and quirky playing. Cheers,
- Robert Lewe, Elkin, NC
Actually, even though it is"commonly" believed that Joe Perry is the Lead guitar player and Brad Whitford the Rhythm guitar player, if you analyze their songs and/or have ever seen them live, you would come to realize that Aerosmith really has TWO Lead guitar players. Quite a few Aerosmith solos (including many very well-known ones - Dream On, Nobody's Fault, Last Child, etc) have been played by Brad Whitford.
- Robert Lewe, Elkin, NC
Actually, to be precise, Brad plays part of the solos in Dream On
- Robert Lewe, Elkin, NC
Always liked Last Child...i was a teenager when I got the "Rocks" album. I recently told some young guy Rocks and toys in the Attic are my favorite Aerosmith Albums.

He alerted me those were early releases..man i'm old
- frank, Morenci , AZ
yeah, but whitford plays lead on this song
- Ben, NYC, MS
Brad Whitford is the rhythm gutarist of Aerosmith, not lead. Lead guitar is Joe Perry. Both are great players by the way.
- Chris, Copenhagen, Denmark
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