Browse by Title
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z #  




John Doe No. 24

by

Mary Chapin Carpenter



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

Carpenter based this song on a true story. In the early hours of October 11, 1945, a scantily dressed black youth was found by 2 police officers rummaging in an alleyway in Jacksonville, Illinois. He was believed to be mentally retarded, and because of his bizarre behavior he was committed to an institution later that month where he became known as John Doe No. 2. John Doe (or Jane Doe) is the generic name given to unidentified bodies, including, apparently, live ones. In spite of attempts to trace his family, John Doe No. 2 - later John Doe No. 24 - was never positively identified, and he would spend the rest of his life being cared for by the state. In 1976, his name was changed for social security reasons to John Doe Boyd (date of birth unknown). He died November 28, 1993. Carpenter read his obituary in the New York Times while sitting in a Starbucks café in Washington, and wrote the song from his perspective.
In 2000, a biography of John Doe by Dave Bakke was published by Southern Illinois University Press; it was called God Knows His Name: The True Story Of John Doe No. 24; Carpenter wrote the foreword and also purchased the headstone for his grave, a photograph of which appears between pages 92 and 93 of the book. (thanks, Alexander - London, England, for above 2)
Mary Chapin Carpenter
More Mary Chapin Carpenter songs
More songs with boys' names in the title
More songs inspired by newspaper or magazine articles
More songs about insanity

We're sorry for the inconvenience. Comments are closed for update.
Mark Arm of MudhoneyMark Arm of Mudhoney
When he was asked to write a song for the Singles soundtrack, Mark thought the Seattle grunge scene was already overblown, so that's what he wrote about.
Richie Wise (Kiss producer, Dust)Richie Wise (Kiss producer, Dust)
Richie talks about producing the first two Kiss albums, recording "Brother Louie," and the newfound appreciation of his rock band, Dust.
Joe Elliott of Def LeppardJoe Elliott of Def Leppard
The Def Leppard frontman talks about their "lamentable" hit he never thought of as a single, and why he's juiced by his Mott The Hoople cover band.
Francis Rossi of Status QuoFrancis Rossi of Status Quo
Doubt led to drive for Francis, who still isn't sure why one of Status Quo's biggest hits is so beloved.