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Boogie On Reggae Woman

by

Stevie Wonder



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

At this point in his career, Wonder had negotiated a contract with Motown records that gave him almost complete control over his recordings. He took advantage by making some very political songs like "You Haven't Done Nothin'," but also recorded some lighter material, like this Reggae-influenced song. The 1972 Johnny Nash hit "I Can See Clearly Now" proved that Reggae could work on the Pop charts, and Wonder used a Reggae groove again on his 1980 song "Master Blaster." (thanks, Edna - Madrid, Spain)
This won the 1974 Grammy for best R&B vocal. Wonder was a Grammy favorite in the '70s, winning three times for album of the year, including a win for Fulfillingness' First Finale.
Wonder recorded this at an extremely prolific time in his career. After turning 21 in 1971, he negotiated a new contract with Motown that put him on the Tamla label and gave him complete creative control. With the considerable help of engineers Robert Margouleff and Malcolm Cecil, he would record constantly, keeping studio time booked wherever he was. "Boogie On Reggae Woman" was one of many songs he put to tape, and it was originally slated for his 1973 Innervisions album. Margouleff convinced him it was a better fit for Fulfillingness', and it became the second single, following "You Haven't Done Nothin'."
Stevie Wonder was one of the first artists to include musician credits on his albums, something Marvin Gaye pioneered in 1971 with What's Going On. On this track, the only musician other than wonder is Rocky Dzidzornu on congas. Wonder is credited with lead vocal, Fender Rhodes, piano, harmonica, drums, Moog bass.
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Comments (4):

On January 26th 1975, "Boogie On Reggae Woman" by Stevie Wonder peaked at #3 (for 2 weeks) on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; it had entered the chart on November 10th, 1974 and spent 17 weeks on the Top 100 (and 8 of those 17 weeks were on the Top 10)...
And on December 22nd, 1974 it reached #1 (for 2 weeks) on Billboard's R&B Singles chart...
It was track 4 on his seventeenth studio album, 'Fulfillingness First Finale', and the album peaked at #1 on both Billboard's Top 200 Albums and Soul Albums charts...
One other track from the album also made the Top 100 chart, "You Haven't Done Nothin'", it reached #1 on both the Top 100 and R&B Singles chart...
And when you're hot, you're hot; his next two releases, "I Wish" and "Sir Duke", both reached #1 on both the Top 100 and R&B Singles chart...
Mr. Wonder, born Stevland Hardaway Judkins, will celebrate his 64th birthday in four months on May 13th (2014).
- Barry, Sauquoit, NY
Smooth. Sensual. Stevie!!! I love this song.
- Tanya, La Verne, CA
This song is anothe Stevie Wonder tour de force! The man has music flowing through his veins, and it is purely displayed here. But, I do NOT hear him say "Boogie on reggae woman" in the chorus. That may be the name of the song, but, at best, I hear "Boogie only woman." Stevie kind of deliberately mumbles in this song. Whatever. Genius!!
- Guy, Woodinville, WA
God, no comments yet? Does nobody know great music at all? The bass was an ARP 2600 synthesizer, but it drove the song like a freaked out live bass player. Wonder also played (to the best of my knowledge) every darned instrument in the song. Drums, piano, everything. It's all Stevie. This song deserves much more credit and accolades than it gets, and seems to be left off of most "'70s Format" playlists in favor of his more popular (but not better) songs. This one is a true classic in rare form.
- Jesse, Madison, WI
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