Browse by Title
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z #  




Factory

by

Bruce Springsteen



Songfacts®:  You can leave comments about the song at the bottom of the page.

This song was influenced by Springsteen's working class father. Bruce did not get along with his dad growing up, but came to appreciate the work he did to raise his family. Bruce never had a job besides making and playing music.
Springsteen earned a reputation for relating to the common man, and this song is a great example why. Explaining how he came to write songs dealing with his father, like this one and "Adam Raised A Cain," Springsteen told Rolling Stone: "When I went to work, I really went to work in my dad's clothes, and it became a way, I suppose, that I honored him and my parents' lives, and a part of my own young life. And then it just became who I was."
Bruce Springsteen
Bruce Springsteen Artistfacts
More Bruce Springsteen songs
More songs about a mother or father

Comments (6):

Bruce Springsteen's father drove a bus. Freehold is the county seat for Monmouth County, NJ and has a sizeable population of professionals such as doctors, administrators, and lawyers. Songs about an administrator's harsh working conditions prove unpopular while songs about downtrodden factory workers prove financially successful. Although Freehold boasted several mills within the borough, Freehold is not an industrial town like Jersey City or Perth Amboy, NJ. Nor is Freehold like the one mill towns depicted in movies, or seen in places like Manville, NJ where the asbestos plant closed due to unintended consequences.

Nevertheless, Springsteen is a gifted song writer. He is a hard working entertainer. He is competitive. And he is a wealthy socialist. Don't let the art define life as a reality, you'll be disillusioned by the delusion.
- Seth, Freehold,
Factory, the song of communism.
- Gene, San Diego, CA
Actually the music to Jesus Christ Superstar was written many years before Bruce's album Darkness on the Edge of Town came out. If Bruce used the melody of "I Don't Know How to Love Him" as the bridge, it would simply be as a symbolic tribute to his father, not Bruce trying to steal the melody.
- Steve, Fenton, MO
I'm almost positive Bruce Springsteen did not copy the short instrumental off Jesus Christ Superstar. He wrote this before that movie or song were made so no it was not intentional.
- Kartik, Peace River, Canada
A friend of mine pointed out that the short solo in Factory is the same melody as the title lyric in the Jesus Christ Superstar song "I Don't Know How to Love Him". I always wondered if that was intentional by Bruce symbolizing his rough relationship with his father.
- Steve, Fenton, MO
Bruce said the only two songs his dad ever liked were the two about him.

This song really makes it clear that Springsteen is all for the working man. Freehold NJ was an inudstrial town.
- Tyler, Hamilton, Canada
You have to to post comments.
Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit and Black Light BurnsWes Borland of Limp Bizkit and Black Light Burns
Wes tells the "Nookie" story, and explains how songwriting compares between Bizkit and Burns.
Charles FoxCharles Fox
After studying in Paris with a famous composition teacher, Charles became the most successful writer of TV theme songs.
Henry McCulloughHenry McCullough
The only Irishman to play at Woodstock (backing Joe Cocker), Henry was an early member of Paul McCartney's band Wings.
Charlie Benante of AnthraxCharlie Benante of Anthrax
The drummer for Anthrax is also a key songwriter. He explains how the group puts their songs together and tells the stories behind some of their classics.