Multiply

Album: single release only (2014)
Charted: 103
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Songfacts®:

  • This hard-hitting anthem about living life to the trillest, finds Rocky dissing streetwear labels Been Trill and Hood by Air, which he has supported in the past ("S--t is weak, you can keep that") and announcing the return of A$AP Mob ("We don't ever die, we just multiply").
  • Rocky pays tribute to the late Pimp C of the Texas based rap group, UGK on the hook, ("Even in my will, keep it trill, to the day I peel"). It was the Southern rapper who coined the adjective "trill," a word describing someone who is considered to be well respected that Rocky frequently uses.
  • A$AP Rocky debuted the track during his set at Coachella on April 11, 2014.
  • The song features a guest appearance from Juicy J, who introduces the track and also raps the outro.
  • Directed by A$AP Rocky and his regular collaborator Shomi Patwary, the video shows the Harlem native and his A$AP Mob colleagues hitting the streets of New York City. Juicy J makes a brief cameo at the beginning of the clip.

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