Rocket

  • This sex jam starts with Beyoncé giving her husband a lap dance. The song continues with several sexual plays on the words 'rock' and 'rocket' as the singer describes making love with her husband. Beyoncé said on the documentary about the making of her album that she decided to make honesty the "glue" that holds it together, a principle that guided this sexual cut. "What I love about this song is it takes you through this journey," the songstress said. "You're talking and you're flirting and you're talking all of this arrogant s—. Then you climax and then you have your cigarette."
  • The song was co-penned by Miguel and Justin Timberlake, both of whom knows a thing or two about writing a sex-filled tune. Whilst this was Miguel's only contribution to Beyoncé, it was one of three songs co-penned by Justin Timberlake for the album, the other two being "Blow," and "Yoncé/Partition."

    Back in 2004, when Timberlake was attempting to transform from a teen pop star to a more adult R&B/Pop singer, he had a hit with a song that also played on the word, 'rock' - "Rock Your Body." Though Timberlake's single took place on the dance floor rather than in bed, its expression of desire to see the object of his affections naked helped him break away from his clean image.
  • The song was produced by J-Roc and Timbaland, who were also responsible for Timberlake's pair of 20/20 Experience albums. The two producers were responsible for four of the raciest tracks on Beyoncé, the other three being "Blow," "Drunk In Love" and "Yoncé/Partition."
  • The black-and-white video was directed by Beyoncé along with Ed Burke and Bill Kirstein and features the singer on a bed in her lingerie, complete with slow-motion shots of water dripping off of her body. Speaking in her documentary, Beyoncé said its only now that feels she can now express every side of herself. "Now I'm in my 30s, and those children that grew up listening to me have grown up, I always felt like it was my responsibility to be aware of kids and their parents," explained the singer. "I felt like it stifled me and I always felt in a sense I could not express everything. I've done so many things in my life and my career that at this point I feel I've earned the right to be me and express any and every side of myself."

    Beyoncé added regarding the "Rocket" clip: "I don't think I would have done it back then; I wouldn't have been comfortable, I would have been too afraid of what people thought but I dropped that fourth wall and I did it."
  • Speaking of the ground-rules Beyoncé set as they walked into the studio together, Miguel recalled: "She said 'don't feel like I won't say something. I want this to say something honest and human. I feel very confident and open at this moment.'"

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