Bad Seamstress Blues / Fallin' Apart At The Seams

Album: Long Cold Winter (1988)
  • In Cinderella frontman Tom Keifer's portfolio, you're unlikely to hear a song that more reflects the influence of the blues on his musical journey. With the making of Cinderella's second album, Long Cold Winter, Keifer was intent on moving the band to a Blues-Rock sound. In our interview with Tom Keifer, he notes he was inspired by his heros Led Zeppelin to start writing his own songs. The band co-produced the album with Andy Johns, whose earlier experience in production included work on Led Zeppelin IV.
  • This song's first verse is introduced in stages. Tom Keifer's acoustic slide intro is reminiscent of Duane Allman playing acoustic slide using his famous Coricidin aspirin bottle. Keifer runs with a Blues chord progression enhanced with a layer of soulful harmonica. The backbeat is laid down with a powerful stomp from the bass drum, and the caveat at the end of the first verse is when Tom yells, "come on boys" and a wall of sound from the electric guitars and bass kicks in.
  • The lyrics are of a life that's come full circle. Mistakes acknowledged, no regrets. You don't have to live a lifetime to experience these emotions. That's the beauty of The Blues: it allows a musician like Tom Keifer to articulate and condense a life on the move. He tells us a story of success and sorrow in a disciplined form that reflects soulful emotion.

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