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Album: Declaration of Independence (2012)

Songfacts®:

  • This is a very personal song for Colt Ford, reflecting on his life growing up in Athens, Georgia. The people and events in the song are all real, including his best friend David, who had spina bifida and was confined to a wheelchair.

    "He never walked a day in his life, but I think till the day he died he thought someday he would," Ford said in our interview. "Where I grew up, he was just one of the kids in our neighborhood and we were just friends. If we rode motorcycles, we figured out a way to strap him on. If we played hide and seek, we pushed him. We went to the skating rink, we pushed him around. And when I said I'd give a million bucks if that old boy was still here, man, I would. For whatever reason, he thought that I was the greatest thing in the world. I'd have given anything for him to see what's happened. He was just always so positive."

    David lived to 29 years old - well past the 18 years that was projected. When David was buried, Ford learned for the first time that his middle name was Reynolds. In tribute to David, Ford named his son Reynolds.
  • The song finds Ford linking up with Jake Owen. Despite growing up in different states - Ford in Georgia and Owen in Florida - the country artists became good friends and found lots of common ground: both are outstanding golfers who value family and were raised in the church. Ford was thrilled when Owen agreed to be part of the song. "He's one of my best friends in the music business, and he instantly related to that," he told us. "I thought he conveyed the message I was trying to say in his vocals, and it meant something to him, too."
  • The lead single from Declaration of Independence, Ford wrote this song with Noah Gordon and Shannon Houchins. Ford penned the verses, and his co-writers came up with the chorus.

    It finds him recounting his memories of growing up. He told the story of the song to Roughstock: "Shannon Houchins had the idea and he and Noah Gordon wrote the chorus and it just came to life. I had to write the verses myself because it was so personal for me. This is my life in this song."
  • The real people and places Ford raps about appear in the music video, which was directed by Potsy Ponciroli. Ford returned to Athens, Georgia to shoot footage of his childhood haunts and his family.

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