Dinosaur Sex

  • London-based singer-songwriter Emmy The Great's second album Virtue was an attempt to write a record based entirely on imaginary situations. However, following a split from a previously-atheist lover, who left her to dedicate himself to the church most of the songs ended up being about herself. She told the NME: "The first half of the album is about impending doom and the second half is about dealing with the aftermath."
  • Emmy discussed this apocalyptic tune with The Guardian: "During one tour I took photos of power plants in the north of England. When I started writing songs for Virtue I stuck these pictures on my wall, along with some of a cargo bay in Hong Kong that had fascinated me as a kid. I'm terrified about climate change in an abstract way, which I imagine is what it was like to be growing up in the shadow of the bomb. I would have been one of those people who built a bunker. I think there is always a young person terrified about the end of the world, whenever and wherever humans have got to."
  • Talking about why she named this song "Dinosaur Sex," she explained to NME: "Someone just said it out loud once and it made me laugh. The point of the song is, 'What did it do?' It did absolutely f--k all for them [dinosaurs] did it?"

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