(Ha Ha) Slow Down
by Fat Joe (featuring Jeezy)

Album: The Darkside Vol. 1 (2010)
  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • This is the first single off American rapper Fat Joe's tenth studio album The Darkside Vol. 1. The Scoop DeVille-produced song features Jeezy and contains a short sample of Soul II Soul's "Back to Life (However Do You Want Me)."
  • Jeezy originally agreed to get on a different track called "Dope Boys" for Joe, but when he got to the studio, DJ Khaled kept raving about this cut, so The Snowman asked to hear it. "He played it for me one time," Jeezy, told MTV News. "We was sitting there, vibing on the verses. I went in there and knocked out the hook."
    "He knocked that hook out quick," Joe added. "I told him we were using that 'Slow down, son, you're killin' 'em,' then he started with that 'We came in this bi--- tonight to murder things. And we gonna leave this bi--- tonight a murder scene.'"
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Did They Really Sing In That Movie?Fact or Fiction

Michael J. Fox, Colin Farrell, Reese Witherspoon, Gwyneth Paltrow and George Clooney: Which actors really sang in their movies?

Justin TimberlakeFact or Fiction

Was Justin the first to be Punk'd by Ashton Kutcher? Did Britney really blame him for her meltdown? Did his bandmates think he was gay?

Jesus Christ Superstar: Ted Neeley Tells the Inside StorySong Writing

The in-depth discussion about the making of Jesus Christ Superstar with Ted Neeley, who played Jesus in the 1973 film.

Booker T. JonesSongwriter Interviews

The Stax legend on how he cooked up "Green Onions," the first time he and Otis Redding saw hippies, and if he'll ever play a digital organ.

Frankie ValliSong Writing

An interview with Frankie Valli, who talks about why his songs - both solo and with The Four Seasons - have endured, and reflects on his time as Rusty Millio on The Sopranos.

Barney Hoskyns Explores The Forgotten History Of Woodstock, New YorkSong Writing

Our chat with Barney Hoskyns, who covers the wild years of Woodstock - the town, not the festival - in his book Small Town Talk.