Are You What You Want to Be

Album: Supermodel (2014)

Songfacts®:

  • Mark Foster's lyrics for the Supermodel album were borne of what he called, "asking a lot of questions internally and trying to process the world around me." On this Afrobeat grooved song he asks:

    "Is this the life you've been waiting for?
    Hoping that you be where you want with a little more."

    Foster admitted to Q magazine: "I've got way more questions and answers."
  • The West African-inspired beat was inspired by The Clash's Sandinista! album. Mark Foster told WXRT DJ Marty Lennartz "We'd been listening to Sandinista! a lot as kind of the music that got us ready to go on stage at the end of touring, so I think that listening to how The Clash was using percussion and we'd also been listening to some West African music and just percussively, that was something we wanted to play with some different rhythms and also use some different sounds that weren't typically used in Western music."
  • This song leans heavily on sounds Mark Foster heard while in Morocco. After he'd finished touring Torches, the frontman took some time off to travel alone. He told WXRT DJ Marty Lennartz: "With my iPhone, I would just record things all over the world. Even on the last year of touring Torches, I would sample things."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Dexys (Kevin Rowland and Jim Paterson)

Dexys (Kevin Rowland and Jim Paterson)Songwriter Interviews

"Come On Eileen" was a colossal '80s hit, but the band - far more appreciated in their native UK than stateside - released just three albums before their split. Now, Dexys is back.

Mark Arm of Mudhoney

Mark Arm of MudhoneySongwriter Interviews

When he was asked to write a song for the Singles soundtrack, Mark thought the Seattle grunge scene was already overblown, so that's what he wrote about.

Early Days of MTV

Early Days of MTVFact or Fiction

If you can recall the days when MTV played videos, you know that there are lots of stories to tell. See if you can spot the real ones.

John Lee Hooker

John Lee HookerSongwriter Interviews

Into the vaults for Bruce Pollock's 1984 conversation with the esteemed bluesman. Hooker talks about transforming a Tony Bennett classic and why you don't have to be sad and lonely to write the blues.

Rickie Lee Jones

Rickie Lee JonesSongwriter Interviews

Rickie Lee Jones on songwriting, social media, and how she's handling Trump.

Songs in Famous Movie Scenes: Tarantino Edition

Songs in Famous Movie Scenes: Tarantino EditionMusic Quiz

Whether he's splitting ears or burning Nazis, Quentin Tarantino uses memorable music in his films. See if you can match the song to the scene.