Lay Down The Law

Album: Yeah, It's That Easy (1997)
  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • G. Love spins many tall tales in his songs, but this one is about a real person, and the events he describes really did happen. Greg was his good friend, the kind of guy who would do whatever he could to help you out. He was also a heroin addict, and when he was using he would do things like steal G. Love's VCR and pawn it for drug money.

    When Songfacts spoke with G. Love in 2019, he said that Greg had been out of contact for a while, but when the song was written, he had kicked the habit and gotten sober. "He was staying with me and working with me," said G. "The song did have a funny vibe because he had a loud personality. We were in the studio one night and he was talking and fooling around, and he was like 'Greg is gonna lay down the law!' It was simple as that for the hook, and then the verses were all about friends having your back."
  • The vocal doesn't come in until 1:28; G. Love whistles for much of the intro.
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