Another Like You

Album: KMAG YOYO (& Other American Stories) (2011)
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Songfacts®:

  • Texas country singer-songwriter Hayes Carll explained to American Songwriter magazine that this song is about, "a culmination of political media personalities… But mostly," he added, "just the thought of trying to pick up someone like… Ann Coulter."
  • American Songwriter selected this as their #1 song of 2011 citing it as, "a sharp-tongued, show-stealing tune about finding love - for one night, at least - across the political divide."
  • KMAG YOYO made many publications Best of Lists. It was voted by the Americana Music Association's as their #1 Album of 2011, as well as being selected by Rolling Stone, Spin magazine and New York Times Critics Choice as one of their records of the year.
  • The song is a duet with folk-roots singer-songwriter Cary Ann Hearst. She performs both as a solo act, and with her husband, Michael Trent, in the band Shovels & Rope.

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