Superstar

Album: Some Kind of Trouble (2010)

Songfacts®:

  • This is a track from British singer-songwriter James Blunt's third studio album, Some Kind of Trouble. The record was recorded in Blunt's private recording studio in Los Angeles and was penned by the singer with The Bird & the Bee's Greg Kurstin whose other collaborations include Lily Allen's UK #1 single, "The Fear."
  • Blunt explained this pointed song's meaning in an interview with Mike Ragnoga of Solar Powered KRUU-FM: "I guess the title is misleading because people think it has to do with my experience in the music business. Instead, it's the way a lot of people will look at the world today. If we asked children twenty years ago what they wanted to be, they would say a doctor, or fireman, or race car driver. Now if you ask, they just want to be famous. You turn on the TV and you see images that tell you success is measured by fame. If you open magazines, they tell you what clothes you should wear or what music you should listen to. The song is the story of a teenager who is saying he doesn't want to be force-fed who I should be, this notion of freedom is not freedom at all. I want to be myself."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Dave Pirner of Soul AsylumSongwriter Interviews

Dave explains how the video appropriated the meaning of "Runaway Train," and what he thought of getting parodied by Weird Al.

SugarlandSongwriter Interviews

Meet the "sassy basket" with the biggest voice in country music.

Director Wes Edwards ("Drunk on a Plane")Song Writing

Wes Edwards takes us behind the scenes of videos he shot for Jason Aldean, Dierks Bentley and Chase Bryant. The train was real - the airplane was not.

Mike Scott of The WaterboysSongwriter Interviews

The stories behind "Whole Of The Moon" and "Red Army Blues," and why rock music has "outlived its era of innovation."

Glen BurtnikSongwriter Interviews

On Glen's résumé: hit songwriter, Facebook dominator, and member of Styx.

Divided Souls: Musical Alter EgosSong Writing

Long before Eminem, Justin Bieber and Nicki Minaj created alternate personas, David Bowie, Bono, Joni Mitchell and even Hank Williams took on characters.