Sunny and 75

Album: Crickets (2013)
Charted: 39

Songfacts®:

  • The first single from Joe Nichols' eighth studio album finds him daydreaming about traveling in the sunshine. "What excites me most about this song is that it's made for radio in the summertime," Nichols told The Boot. "It's driving energy to me ... you can picture the video right off the bat. When I listened to the song, within 45 seconds I've already got a visual image in my head of driving around in a convertible with your arm around a girl and the wind blowing through your hair. Sometimes you just feel it, it's obvious."
  • Joe described the song to The Boot as sounding, "as if Journey were to cut a country song and I were to cover that country song."
  • The song was written by Michael Dulaney, Jason Sellers and Paul Jenkins. "The energy is the first thing that struck me about 'Sunny and 75,'" Nichols told Radio.com. "The song slowly builds into this screaming, almost like a Journey 'Don't Stop Believin'' kind of tempo. So that to me is important, because the music itself brings out emotions, not just the lyrics or how you deliver them. The music builds, and it takes you on a journey. You feel like you're slowly and steadily moving out to the beach, and all the sudden you're sprinting."

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