Devil's Jump

Album: The Best Of John Lee Hooker (1949)
  • Lyric-wise there is nothing special about this John Lee Hooker composition, but as Pete Townshend said in the November 2014 BBC documentary Play It Loud: The Story Of The Marshall Amp, Hooker had the idea of putting the microphone inside the guitar, restringing the instrument and singing into it which gave "this incredible distorted noise." Townshend said it blew him away the first time he heard it, adding that "[Rock musicians] can't claim to have invented distortion."
  • "Devil's Jump" was released in 1949, and was also credited to Texas Slim (a Hooker pseudonym). Like other obscure releases such as "Mockin' Bird Hill" (1951) and "Space Guitar" (1954), it shows the debt later generations of musicians owe to their predecessors, or as Sir Isaac Newton put it, standing on the shoulders of giants. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Angelo Moore of FishboneSongwriter Interviews

Fishbone has always enjoyed much more acclaim than popularity - Angelo might know why.

Timothy B. Schmit of the EaglesSongwriter Interviews

Did this Eagle come up with the term "Parrothead"? And what is it like playing "Hotel California" for the gazillionth time?

Bill Medley of The Righteous BrothersSongwriter Interviews

Medley looks back on "Unchained Melody" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" - his huge hits from the '60s that were later revived in movies.

TV Theme SongsFact or Fiction

Was a Beatles song a TV theme? And who came up with those Fresh Prince and Sopranos songs?

Richie McDonald of LonestarSongwriter Interviews

Richie talks about the impact of "Amazed," and how his 4-year-old son inspired another Lonestar hit.

Country Song TitlesFact or Fiction

Country songs with titles so bizarre they can't possibly be real... or can they?