Grow Old With Me

Album: Milk And Honey (1984)
  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • Lennon recorded this as a home demo on a cassette tape in the late 1970s, and had planned to record it properly on the follow-up album to Double Fantasy. Unfortunately he was killed before he could record a studio version. Yoko Ono released his single-track version of this on the Milk And Honey posthumous album in 1984. Later she asked Beatles producer George Martin to score an orchestral arrangement for this to use on the 1998 Lennon Anthology set.
  • Paul McCartney wanted to make this the third Beatles "reunion song," but producer Jeff Lynne told him this would be very difficult because of a hum on the cassette that couldn't be eliminated. Also, George Harrison objected because it was too sad, given the nature of John's death - Yoko couldn't "grow old along with him," as the song urged. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Ken - Louisville, KY, for above 2
  • Yoko Ono explained the origin of this song in the liner notes of her 1983 album Milk & Honey: A Heart Play: "One early morning in the summer of 1980, I woke up with 'Let Me Count The Ways' ringing in my head. I called John who was then in Bermuda and played it over the phone. 'How d'you like it?' 'I really like it. It's beautiful.' 'How about you writing one with a Robert Browning line and we'll have portraits of us as Elizabeth and Robert on the cover?'
    John called me that afternoon 'Hey, you won't believe this!' He explained that he was watching the TV, a '50s film of a baseball player. In the film, John saw the girlfriend send a poem to her baseball player, a poem which was one by Robert Browning called Grow Old Beside Me. 'Can you believe that?..so anyway, this is my version.' John proudly played his song over the phone. That's how our two songs happened."
  • This is a very romantic song that's not about blinding passion, but about caring and commitment. It's a very popular wedding song.
  • Mary Chapin Carpenter and The Postal Service recorded popular covers of this song.
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments: 5

  • Paula from Laredo, TxI think that the best punishment for the creep who killed John would be for humanity never to utter or write his name in connection to John. Erase him from history! John is still here with us through his music. The actions of one man can't take that away. EVER!
  • Brad from Lexington, Ky This song makes me extremely sad every time I hear it. The poor guy sings "the best is yet to come" and "grow old with me", when his life would be over in just a few weeks. He never got a chance to grow old. That's the bitter irony of this song, as well as another one he wrote called "Life Begins At 40", when he had no idea that his life would actually end. So sad. I hope the monster of a man that killed him never gets out of prison.
  • Bmn from Hisuan, ArgentinaRegarding the hum, it wasn't on "grow old with me" but on "now and then" which has very sparse lyrics and a noisy buzz also (there's a demo floating on the net). Now and then should have been the third reworked demo, while grow old with me was maybe offered at first but declined by the threetles (who preferred a really unreleased song which was Free As A Bird).
  • Ian from Lethbridge, CanadaIt is George, but it's comforting to know that the final moments of John Lennon's life were in comfort and peace. He had some very hard times in his life, and I'm happy for John that this wasn't one of them. R.I.P. dude.
  • George from Calumet City, IlBoth a very beautiful and very sad song at the same time.
see more comments

Billy Joe ShaverSongwriter Interviews

The outlaw country icon talks about the spiritual element of his songwriting and his Bob Dylan mention.

John Lee HookerSongwriter Interviews

Into the vaults for Bruce Pollock's 1984 conversation with the esteemed bluesman. Hooker talks about transforming a Tony Bennett classic and why you don't have to be sad and lonely to write the blues.

John WaiteSongwriter Interviews

"Missing You" was a spontaneous outpouring of emotion triggered by a phone call. John tells that story and explains what MTV meant to his career.

Leslie West of MountainSongwriter Interviews

From the cowbell on "Mississippi Queen" to recording with The Who when they got the wrong Felix, stories from one of rock's master craftsmen.

Richie McDonald of LonestarSongwriter Interviews

Richie talks about the impact of "Amazed," and how his 4-year-old son inspired another Lonestar hit.

Dexys (Kevin Rowland and Jim Paterson)Songwriter Interviews

"Come On Eileen" was a colossal '80s hit, but the band - far more appreciated in their native UK than stateside - released just three albums before their split. Now, Dexys is back.