What I Like About You

Album: Single release only (2019)
Charted: 16

Songfacts®:

  • Jonas Blue joins forces with Theresa Rex for this dance-pop anthem. This is the first time they have worked together; the UK producer had wanted to collaborate with the Danish singer ever since he heard her voice on Martin Jensen's "Solo Dance."
  • Jonas Blue wrote the song with Lene Dissing and Peter Bjørnskov, who are part of the songwriting team Startone Music together with Sune Haansbæk. Dissing and Bjørnskov previously co-penned Martin Jensen's "Solo Dance."
  • The song is about the rush of craziness that often accompanies early love. Jonas Blue told UK's Metro newspaper that lyrically, "What I Like About You" is similar to his debut hit "Fast Car."

    "It's a relationship that turned rebellious and the idea is that this person, this woman goes against the wishes of all her friends and family about being in this relationship," he explained. "But she does it anyway because of the power of love and the way she feels about this person."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Song CitiesMusic Quiz

Nirvana, Billy Joel and Bruce Springsteen are among those who wrote songs with cities that show up in this quiz.

Motley CrueFact or Fiction

Was Dr. Feelgood a dentist? Did the "Crüecifixion" really happen?

Songs About MoviesSong Writing

Iron Maiden, Adele, Toto, Eminem and Earth, Wind & Fire are just some of the artists with songs directly inspired by movies - and not always good ones.

Mick Jones of ForeignerSongwriter Interviews

Foreigner's songwriter/guitarist tells the stories behind the songs "Juke Box Hero," "I Want To Know What Love Is," and many more.

Part of Their World: The Stories and Songs of 13 Disney PrincessesSong Writing

From "Some Day My Prince Will Come" to "Let It Go" - how Disney princess songs (and the women who sing them) have evolved.

John Lee HookerSongwriter Interviews

Into the vaults for Bruce Pollock's 1984 conversation with the esteemed bluesman. Hooker talks about transforming a Tony Bennett classic and why you don't have to be sad and lonely to write the blues.