ISIS
by Joyner Lucas (featuring Logic)

Album: ADHD (2019)
Charted: 42 59

Songfacts®:

  • Joyner Lucas began to fall out with fellow rapper Logic when they both collaborated with Tech N9ne on his 2016 cut "Sriracha." Over the next couple of years, the pair traded insults at each another on various records. Eventually the pair resolved their vendetta and now they have reunited on this track.

    Logic explains on this song that they have now finished their feud and have buried the hatchet. He emphasizes his point by interpolating The Notorious B.I.G.'s '"What's Beef?"
  • The song is named after the Middle Eastern terrorist group ISIS; the two rappers mention the organization a couple of times in order to express their threat. Elsewhere, Lucas spits bars aimed at his haters and in the interlude makes a statement about the mental condition ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). Logic also talks about his rise to success and references his collaboration with Eminem, "Homicide."

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