Area Codes

Album: Word of Mouf (2001)
Charted: 25 24
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Songfacts®:

  • Ludacris' rhymes focus on the US telephone area codes that denote the location of women with whom he has had sexual relations in cities across the country. He lists 43 different area codes in total; asked how he chose which ones to include on the cut during a Reddit AMA, Ludacris explained: "The song could only be but so... long. And yes, there are many area codes that I wish I could've put in there. However, I tried to get the ones that were as honest to the actual hoes I had in those area codes as possible."
  • The lead single from Word of Mouf, this was originally released on the soundtrack to Rush Hour 2.
  • In the clean version, "pros" is substituted for "hoes."
  • That's the late Nate Dogg crooning the hook and bridge (He died in 2011 from complications of multiple strokes.) In the early 1990s Nate Dogg was in a rap trio called 213 with another canine-monikered artist, one Snoop Dogg who was known as Snoop Doggy Dog at the time. He references his old group here when he sings:

    I call (I call), come running
    2-1-2 or 2-1-3
    You know that I ball (I ball), stop fronting
    Or I'll call my substitute freak (hoes)
  • The song was included briefly in a scene from The Fast and the Furious. Ludacris didn't appear in that film, but he went on to play Tej Parker in later editions of the movie franchise.

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