Killers Who Are Partying

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  • "Killers Who Are Partying" finds Madonna reeling off a number of persecuted minorities from around the world.

    I'll be Islam, if Islam is hated
    I'll be Israel, if they're incarcerated
    I'll be Native Indian, if the Indian has been taken
    I'll be a woman, if she's raped and her heart is breaking


    Other marginalized people that Madonna invokes include gays, Africans, the poor and children.
  • During an interview with NME, Madonna was asked whether as a white woman of privilege she can really claim to have an affinity with all the minorities that she lists.

    "But I'm a human being," Madonna responded sharply. "And they're human beings. And I've always fought for the rights of marginalized people so it's not like I woke up one day and decided I was going to be the voice of a certain minority. I consider myself a marginalized person, I feel like I've been discriminated against my whole life because of the fact that I'm a female and now I am discriminated against because of my age. I am saying 'no, we belong together' and it's a song about unifying the soul of all humans. And I have the right to say that I want to do that."
  • The post chorus and bridge is sung by Madonna in Portuguese, influenced by her years living in Lisbon. They translates as:

    The world is wild
    The path is lonely
    The world is wild
    The path is lonely
    It is, it is, it is, it is
    It is, it is, it is, it is
    It is, it is, it is, it is
    It is, it is, it is, it is

    I know what I am
    And I know what I'm not (Am, am, am, am)
    I know what I am
    And I know what I'm not (Am, am, am, am)
    The world (Wild is the world)
    Wild is the world (Is wild)
    Wild is the world (It is, it is, it is, it is)
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