I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside

Album: Round The Town (1909)
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Songfacts®:

  • Written by John A. Glover-Kind in 1909, "I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside" captures the spirit of the times when ordinary working people in Britain flocked to the coast in their thousands by train to resorts such as Blackpool and Morecambe in the North of England for day trips and their first proper holidays. Train travel for the masses had only really started in the 1870s, and for Sheridan, who was born in the North East, this was his third big hit. Dressed eccentrically in top hat and bell bottom trousers, he encapsulated the sense of fun that many must have felt.
  • According to Brian Rust in British Music Hall On Record, Sheridan recorded this song on Jumbo at London in October 1909.

    Sadly, this time serving fun-loving entertainer had only a few years left; in 1918 he committed suicide in Glasgow, but the song he made famous has been recorded many times since in both vocal and instrumental versions, including in the introduction to Queen's "Brighton Rock." >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2

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