3am Bounce

Album: Brass Knuckles (2015)
  • This is one of the most popular songs from the No BS! Brass Band, a 12-man operation out of Richmond, Virginia. "3am Bounce" is an instrumental, but it tells a story. In a Songfacts interview, group leader Reggie Pace took us through it.

    "'3am Bounce' is a song about having long conversations about the state of the world and politics, and really getting into it late at night," he said. "The beginning of the song has that drama in it, and then it finally unfolds into this groove. It starts huge like a movie and then it unfolds into this groove, and that's us remembering that we're friends and still talking through things. Being upset about things doesn't really change that we all have to go about our day tomorrow.

    So, it's like you take a second to breathe and there's a moment in the music where everything drops out except the trombone section, and it's like that [long exhale]...

    Then the song keeps going and it unfolds: We aren't going to stop fighting for what we think is right."
  • In 2017, the group released a version with vocals from the rapper Chance Fischer.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Donald FagenSongwriter Interviews

Fagen talks about how the Steely Dan songwriting strategy has changed over the years, and explains why you don't hear many covers of their songs.

Bill Medley of The Righteous BrothersSongwriter Interviews

Medley looks back on "Unchained Melody" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" - his huge hits from the '60s that were later revived in movies.

Angelo Moore of FishboneSongwriter Interviews

Fishbone has always enjoyed much more acclaim than popularity - Angelo might know why.

U2Fact or Fiction

How did The Edge get his name? Did they name a song after a Tolkien book? And who is "Angel of Harlem" about?

How "A Rolling Stone Gathers No Moss" Became Rock's Top ProverbSong Writing

How a country weeper and a blues number made "rolling stone" the most popular phrase in rock.

Is That Song Public Domain?Fact or Fiction

Are classic songs like "Over The Rainbow" and "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" in the public domain?