Kreen-Akrore

Album: McCartney (1970)

Songfacts®:

  • Paul McCartney closed his debut solo album with this experimental percussion-based instrumental inspired by a UK television documentary on the Kreen-Akrore Indians of the Brazilian Amazon rain forest. The program was titled The Tribe That Hides From Man and it aired on the UK's ITV network on February 11, 1970.
  • The song was McCartney's attempt to sonically describe a hunt by the Kreen-Akrore. The ex-Beatle said:

    "There was a film on TV about the Kreen-Akrore Indians living in the Brazilian jungle, their lives, and how the white man is trying to change their way of life to his, so the next day, after lunch, I did some drumming. The idea behind it was to get the feeling of their hunt. So later piano, guitar and organ were added to the first section." (Source of quote The Beatles Bible.)
  • A guitar case was used as a percussion instrument, and a bow and arrow provided further sound effects. Apparently the bow broke during McCartney's recording of the song.

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