New Day Coming

Album: Proof of Life (2013)

Songfacts®:

  • This song finds Scott Stapp singing of a new season in his life after years of self-destructive behavior. "I'm more positive than at any time in my life," he explained. "That's because I view my situation realistically. In the past I viewed my situation through a fog. But sobriety of body and spirit has lifted that fog. As the songs says, 'I'm standing still on the edge of a knife, just ready for a fight.' The fight, of course, is with the forces of negation: over-bloated ego and the old temptations of mind-altering toxins."

    "Paradoxically, because I have surrendered," Stapp continued, "I've given up my willingness in favor of following the will of the spirit of love—I can claim victory and see the new day coming. Without the support of my wife Jacyln and our three kids—standing by me every step of the way—this new day would never be possible."

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