Where's Your Car Debbie?

Album: Single Release Only (2014)

Songfacts®:

  • The Tunbridge Wells garage rock duo Slaves comprise drummer Isaac Holman and guitarist Laurie Vincent. The pair share the vocals. This song, their debut single was released through Fonthill Records. It finds the band lost in local woods, trying to find their friend Debbie's car, scared that they're going to get attacked by Bigfoot.

    The story, Holman insisted to the Kent Courier, is real – as is friend-of-a-friend Debbie. "We had agreed to walk Debbie back to her car and the song is about being very, very scared of bumping into Bigfoot," he explained.
  • Apparently, Slaves aren't speaking to Debbie any more. "She really let us down when we were filming the video," Holman explained to NME. "She was going to play Debbie but she just didn't turn up."

Comments: 1

  • Evie from EnglandDoes anybody know who produced this song?
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