Hot Fun in the Summertime

Album: Greatest Hits (1969)
Charted: 2
  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • On the surface, this is a song dedicated to summer and all the fun memories accompanying it. However, if studied further, the song reveals an undercurrent of sadness regarding the race riots of 1969. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Tanya - La Verne, CA
  • This song was released shortly after the Woodstock festival, where the band did a memorable set. This helped pique interest in Sly & the Family Stone, and gave the song a nice boost on the charts.
  • The Beach Boys recorded this on their 1992 album Summer in Paradise.
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Comments: 7

  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn August 3rd 1969, "Hot Fun In the Summertime" by Sly and the Family Stone entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #79; and on October 12th, 1969 it peaked at #2 {for 2 weeks} and spent 16 weeks on the Top 100 {and for 7 of those 16 weeks it was on the Top 10}...It reached #3 on Billboard's R&B Chart.
  • Camille from Toronto, OhI love the poetic sound of the lyrics: hi, hi, hi, hi there....bye, bye, bye, bye there. Definitely a bit of melancholy and a yearning for the simpler days. That's what I think of when I hear the song. It has the 'take things a little slower, it's summertime' kind of feel. "County fair in the country sun".....my, my, my, my there.
  • Muzica from Atlanta, GaAnger? Geez, Louise . . . sounds some negative projection here. Great song . . . if there's any melancholy, perhaps it might be that he (Sly) wished for those innocent days when all people could live freely without the social conditions that breed ignorance and hatred. Maybe his soul knew and desired that place of freedom, innocence, creativity, vulnerability and justice for all. Maybe the daily realities that he understood all to well was what he tried to self-medicate from with drugs. But the song? Not an ounce of anger, not in the lyric, nor the music. More summer, more springs . . . may we have this to look forward to in our world.
  • Matt from Galway, IrelandI find this song not so much melancholic but angry about the summer. I mean, being Sly and the Family Stone, I read anger and social concern in this song as much as in Stand! Maybe it's just me, but that's kind of how react to most songs by Sly Stone
  • Amara from Victorille, CaI meant "because", sorry about the typo.
  • Amara from Victorille, CaOnly one comment on this one?? Shame, because this is such a classic.
  • John from Nashville, TnThis song, "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" and "Everybody Is A Star" were supposed to be part of a new studio album by Sly and the Family Stone. However, due to Sly's drug problems and CBS Records demands for a new Sly album, the three tracks were released on the band's first bestselling Greatest Hits album.
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