('Til) I Kissed You

Album: The Fabulous Style of The Everly Brothers (1959)
Charted: 2 4
  • Don Everly wrote this amorous number about a life-altering smooch after a dalliance he had while the Everly Brothers were on tour in Australia. "I wrote it about a girl I met on that trip," he said in a 1998 interview. "Her name was Lillian, and she was very, very inspirational. I was married, but... you know."
  • This features Chet Atkins on guitar and Jerry Allison of The Crickets on drums.
  • This also peaked at #8 on the Country chart.
  • Country singer Connie Smith covered this on her 1976 album, Songs We Fell In Love To. Her version was a #10 Country hit in the US and also topped Canada's country chart.
  • Several reggae artists have covered this, including Al Campbell, Delroy Jones, Nan McClean, Dobbie Dobson, Jimmy London, and Shinehead.
  • This was used in the 1973 movie That'll Be The Day, starring David Essex as an aspiring rock musician.
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Does Jimmy Page Worship The Devil? A Look at Satanism in RockSong Writing

We ring the Hell's Bells to see what songs and rockers are sincere in their Satanism, and how much of it is an act.

Chris IsaakSongwriter Interviews

Chris tells the story of "Wicked Game," talks milkshakes and moonpies at Sun Records, and explains why women always get their way.

Bass Player Scott EdwardsSong Writing

Scott was Stevie Wonder's bass player before becoming a top session player. Hits he played on include "I Will Survive," "Being With You" and "Sara Smile."

Black SabbathFact or Fiction

Dwarfs on stage with an oversize Stonehenge set? Dabbling in Satanism? Find out which Spinal Tap-moments were true for Black Sabbath.

Hawksley WorkmanSongwriter Interviews

One of Canada's most popular and eclectic performers, Hawksley tells stories about his oldest songs, his plentiful side projects, and the ways that he keeps his songwriting fresh.

Adam Duritz of Counting CrowsSongwriter Interviews

"Mr. Jones" took on new meaning when the song about a misguided view of fame made Adam famous.