Birthday Boy
by Ween

Album: GodWeenSatan: The Oneness (1990)

Songfacts®:

  • You can hear Pink Floyd's "Echoes" in the background of this song, towards the end.
  • This song was written about the same woman "Baby Bitch" was written for on a later album. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Andrew - Abyss, PA, for above 2

Comments: 3

  • Apacheninja01 from Here On EarthChristina from Wolcott, Gene, Wrote Birthday boy on his birthday. I hope this answers your question. Oh, it's about an ex GF it's sequel baby bitch is about the same girl.
  • Christina from Wolcott, CtThe title of this song is not part of the lyrics. You should put it in the category"Songs With Titles That Are Not Part of the Lyrics". Why was this song called Birthday Boy? Who is the birthday boy?
  • Jennifer from Little Rock, ArI am pretty sure there is also a Pink Floyd/Ummagumma reference on Don't Laugh--I love you...at the end...sounds like "Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict"
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