The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone

Album: The Lonely, The Lonesome & The Gone (2017)
  • Nobody writes goodbye notes
    And takes off to God-only-knows on trains anymore
    And to tell you the truth
    I don't really see much use in walking the floor

    Old songs make it sound so cool
    To be a half-drunk heartbroke fool
    When that fool is you, it's not
    And the only way this heartache
    Is like an old Hank Williams song
    Is the lonely, the lonesome, and the gone

    There's a place down by the mall
    But it ain't what you'd call a honky tonk
    They got a new jukebox
    Filled up with country rock
    'Cause that's what folks want

    I don't know why no one sings about
    Drowning in pitchers and half-priced wings
    And trying to wish back everything they lost
    Yeah the only way this heartache
    Is like an old Hank Williams song
    Is the lonely, the lonesome, and the gone

    He never sang about watching a Camry pulling out
    Of a crowded apartment parking lot
    But I guess in some ways
    Every heartache is like an old Hank Williams song
    There's the lonely, the lonesome, and the gone
    There's the lonely, the lonesome, and the gone Writer/s: Adam Wright, Jay Knowles
    Publisher: Bluewater Music Corp.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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