Nature Boy

Album: Best Of Nat King Cole (1947)
Charted: 1
  • There was a boy
    A very strange enchanted boy
    They say he wandered very far, very far
    Over land and sea
    A little shy and sad of eye
    But very wise was he

    And then one day
    A magic day he passed my way
    And while we spoke of many things
    Fools and kings
    This he said to me
    The greatest thing you'll ever learn
    Is just to love and be loved in return

    The greatest thing you'll ever learn
    Is just to love and be loved in return Writer/s: Eden Ahbez
    Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc., Songtrust Ave
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 11

  • Pamela V Humes from PampThis song is a master piece and it is correct I feel the you don't have to write a couple of sentences or a paragraph to get a meaning across and it hits home for a lot of us but if you don't get it you may tomorrow
  • David from OrlandoNature Boy is one of my favorite songs throughout history, especially the original version with the instrumentation and Nat King Cole's beautiful vocal performance. I actually interpreted the lyrics to be about a Peter Pan type of person who lived an unusual, yet fascinating life that somehow impacted others, only to later realize the "hippie" writer, Eden Ahbez, was actually writing an autobiographical piece of poetry that illustrated his own unusual, yet believable experiences. It actually can be interpreted in a Judeo-Christian way with speaking about fools and kings prior to the simple, timeless lesson of love being the greatest lesson one can ever learn. By the way, the Natalie Cole version appeared on her Unforgettable album where in addition to doing the legendary "duet" with her famous father on the title track, she covered many of his classics, including Nature Boy, in her own solo style accompanied my many talented musicians, some of whom worked for Mr. Cole himself. Nat King Cole also did a parody of this and other hit songs from his career in a live recording on his box set. "Mr. Cole Won't Rock And Roll" satirized how the emergence of rock and roll of the 1950's shifted pop music preferences, especially among teens, away from the sweeter, romantic style that Nat, Frank Sinatra, and many others were doing. Though many jazz purists may not like the direction Nat King Cole would take over the next decade and a half, I believe these songs made him able to do even more for music and society than being a purely instrumental pianist and bandleader ever could have, as talented as he was in those areas.
  • Raghav from Fremont, CaA most beautiful song :) First recorded by Nat King Cole as mentioned above.. and then covered by a whole bunch of people including the likes of Frank Sinatra, David Bowie, Miles Davis (instrumental), Natalie Cole, Cher, Celine Dion, Bobby Darin, Kurt Elling, Jose Feliciano and I'm sure I've missed a few others..
  • Megan from Stevenson, AlThis song is amazing as a lullaby! lol I Adored Casey Abrams' vesrion of this on American Idol!! He's amazing!
  • Jim from Morgantown, WvThere's a really nice version of this by YouTube sensation Pomplamoose. It's at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LNpwBpZUrzk
  • Llani Smarzo from Syracuse, NyI thought this song was about Buddha or Jesus Christ!
  • Sgt. Pepper from Ankara, TurkeyThere is also a nice cover of this song in the "Collector's Item" album of Grace Slick & The Great Society with a flute solo in it.
  • Chris from La Jolla, CaThis song was also used during the opening credits for the 2001 movie "Moulin Rouge" covered by, I think, David Bowie.
  • Ekristheh from Halath, United StatesThis was covered by Leonard Nimoy on his "Touch" album. Really quite nice.
  • Edward from West Hartford, CtThis song is also featured in the 1948 film "The Boy with Green Hair." This is the song that really launched Nat King Cole's singing career. Dean Stockwell stars as the boy in a very strange but touching film.
  • Reg from Kemptville, OnThis song was recorded by Annie Haslam on her 1977 album "Annie in Wonderland". Her's is actually the only version I REMEMBER hearing.
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