Heaven And Hell

Album: Live At Leeds (1970)
  • On top of the sky is a place where you go if you've done nothing wrong
    If you've done nothing wrong
    And down in the ground is a place where you go if you've been a bad boy
    If you've been a bad boy

    Why can't we have eternal life
    And never die
    Never die?
    In the place up above you grow feather wings and you fly round and round
    With a harp singing hymns

    And down in the ground you grow horns and a tail and you carry a fork
    And burn away

    Why can't we have eternal life, and never die
    Never die? Writer/s: JOHN ENTWISTLE
    Publisher: GOWMONK, INC.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 14

  • Maelje from Kansas City, Missouri, MoIt's finally good to hear the version on "Live At Hull," after all these years of people thinking the show was unreleasable because so much of John's bass parts had not been recorded! Not true -- only the first reel lacked it. Since "Heaven and Hell" is the opening track, the bass performance was "flown in" from the Leeds shows, digitally, for the "Live at Hull" release. I think it works beautifully.
  • Wes from Hockley, ArI found the Summertime Blues/ Heaven and Hell 45 at a garage sale when I was a kid, so the single version was the only one I knew until a few minutes ago when I heard the one on Leeds for the first time. Not to go against the grain, but I prefer the studio version.

    Entwistle was a badass, huh?

    I was at the Hard Rock in Vegas about a week after his passing there. I've thought about that and the death of Toto's drummer (from the same causes) recently.

  • Brad from Lexington, KyThe Live at Leeds version kicks the studio version's butt. They both are good though. I also like John Entwistle's solo recording.
  • Jc from Tucson, AzGreat song with a very simple meaning.
  • Roy from Granbania, MaYoung Man Blues from Live at the Isle of Wight is the best live performance I have ever seen or heard and it was very close to perfect on Live at Leeds as well. I think it's pretty amazing that there's no songfacts page for that song, which actually appeared on the original LP version of Live at Leeds, unlike Heaven and Hell (which is also pretty great).
  • Jc from Tucson, AzOnly Entwistle could break things down to such a simple level. You either go to heavan or hell.
  • Jack from Riverside, CaThe Who used this to open their set frequently from 1968 to 1970.
  • Lester from New York City, NyEntwistle does the song very well on 'Smash Your Head Against the Wall'.
  • Allen from Bethel, AkHmmm. I think John should have sung more...
  • Jon from Tucson, AzThe Who used Heaven and Hell to open their set at Woodstock.
  • Griffin from New York, NyMy dad has the original Summertime Blues single. Haven't been able to listen to either song yet except on Live at Leeds. The Live at Leeds versions are incredible!!
  • Jaym from The Dark Side Of The MoonI love this song. It's awesome live.
  • David Corino from Hawley, PaWhat els would you except Erik?
  • Barry from New York, NcYou can see a live version of this song in the video THE WHO LIVE AT THE ISLE OF WIGHT FESTIVAL 1970.
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