Daydreamer

  • Adele explained to the Sun newspaper January 18, 2008 that this song is about falling for a bisexual friend: "It was about a friend of mine, who's still one of my best friends and he was bi. I am so jealous of girls anyway that having to fight with boys as well, I just couldn't do it. But I started falling in love with him around my 18th birthday. He convinced me that it would be fine but that night he kissed one of my best boyfriends and I was like: 'Get lost!'"
  • Marc Shapiro recounted the background to this song in his unofficial tome Adele: The Biography. He explained that it was inspired by, "a first love gone terribly bad," with a bisexual guy. "Adele had professed her love and he did the same, she had known he was bisexual but, in the rush of romance, felt they could make it work," he continued. "Four hours after laying their emotional cards on the table, the boy ran off with one of Adele's gay friends!"

    Despite the humiliation Adele and her bisexual beau continued to try to make their relationship work, but after four months of him cheating on her, Adele decided she'd had enough.

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