Chain Of Fools

Album: Aretha: Lady Soul (1967)
Charted: 43 2
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  • This was written around 1953 by Don Covay, an R&B singer who wrote songs that were recorded by The Rolling Stones ("Mercy Mercy), Wilson Pickett ("I'm Gonna Cry"), Otis Redding ("Think About It") and many others. Covay also recorded the song, but his version went nowhere.
  • The song is about a woman who realizes she is one of many girls in her boyfriend's "Chain." Even though she knows this can never last, she sticks with him anyway.
  • This won a Grammy for Best Female R&B Performance in 1969. That category was introduced in 1968; Franklin won the first eight years, adding three more trophies in the '80s.
  • This gained new fans when it was featured in the 1996 movie Michael, starring John Travolta as an unlikely archangel come to Earth. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Darryl - Queensland, Australia
  • Joe South played the guitar intro. A prominent session guitarist, he also wrote several hit songs, including "Hush," which became a hit for Deep Purple.
  • The Lady Soul sessions were fraught with emotion as Franklin was struggling with the end of her marriage to manager Ted White, a relationship plagued by domestic violence. Atlantic producer Jerry Wexler recalled the singer showing up to the studio with a black eye, which Jet magazine called "an eye injury suffered in a fall" due to Franklin's clumsiness, but her friends knew better.

    She was also devastated by the tragic loss of Otis Redding, who died in a plane crash on December 10, 1967. Wexler told David Ritz, author of Respect: The Life of Aretha Franklin: "If many of the vocals on Lady Soul seem to have an even greater depth, I believe it's because Otis was on Aretha's mind."
  • Franklin's sister Carolyn, who is one of the backing singers on the track, felt the tune reflected her sister's tumultuous marriage. "Aretha didn't write 'Chain,'" she told David Ritz, "but she might as well have. It was her story. When we were in the studio putting on the backgrounds with Ree doing lead, I knew she was singing about Ted. Listen to the lyrics talking about how for five long years she thought he was her man. Then she found out she was nothing but another link in the chain. Then she sings that her father told her to come on home. Well, he did. She sings about how her doctor told her to take it easy. Well he did, too. She was drinking so much we thought she was on the verge of a breakdown. The line that slew me, though, was the one that said how one of these mornings the chain is gonna break but until then she'll take all she can take. That summed it up. Ree knew damn well that this man had been doggin' her since Jump Street. But some how she held on and pushed it to the breaking point. I can't listen to that song without thinking about the tipping point in her long ugly thing with Ted."
  • Along with Carolyn, the other supporting vocalists are fellow Franklin sister Erma, the R&B girl group The Sweet Inspirations, and pop singer-songwriter Ellie Greenwich. Greenwich was a last-minute addition after Wexler played her the pre-mastered version and she started singing along with it. "I whisked her into the studio, where she recorded it, making the super-thick harmonies that much thicker," Wexler recalled.
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Comments: 14

  • Jennifur Sun from RamonaRotunda have heard recently that it wasn't Joe but another player who did the opening.
  • Jennifur Sun from RamonaDidn't the Swampers from Muscle Shoals play on this track?
  • Jennifur Sun from RamonaLove that opening, sort of growling guitar not by the late Joe South.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn December 27th 1967, Aretha Franklin was a guest on the NBC-TV's Kraft Music Hall special, 'Woody Allen Looks at 1967'...
    At the time she had two records on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; "Chain of Fools" was in it first of two weeks at #7, and on January 14th, 1968 it peaked at #2 {see second post below}...
    Her other Top 100 record at the time was "Mockingbird"; it was in its second week a #94, that was also its peak position, for it only stayed on the chart for two weeks...
    Interestingly, on the Allen special she performed "Respect", which peaked at #1 {for 2 weeks} earlier in 1967 on May 28th.
  • Rotunda from Tulsa, OkMercy! What a huge hit for Aretha! I love the guitar work on this & didn't know it was by the famous Joe South, until I read it right here on Songfacts.com. Interesting. I recall seeing a photo of Aretha being presented a Gold Record award for "Chain of Fools" in some magazine (Billboard?). She has a slew of gold records! And she's still The Queen.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn December 23rd 1967, "Chain of Fools" by Aretha Franklin peaked at #1 (for 6 weeks) on Cash Box's Top R&B Singles chart...
    (Note: From Nov. 1963 to Jan. 1965 Billboard did not publish an R&B Singles chart)...
    And on December 3rd, 1967 it entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; on January 14th, 1968 it peaked at #2 (for 2 weeks) and spent 12 weeks on the Top 100...
    The two weeks it was at #2 on the Top 100, the #1 record was "Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)" by John Fred and His Playboy Band...
    It won a Grammy Award for 'Best Female R&B Vocal Performance'...
    Was track one of side one of her album, "Lady Soul", and on March 2nd, 1968 the album peaked at #1 (for 16 non-consecutive weeks) on Billboard's Top R&B Albums chart.
  • Elmer H from Westville, Ok"Chain of Fools" is one of my all-time favorites. Awesome hit for Aretha. I love the guitar, the driving drums, and Aretha's voice. And wasn't 1967 a great year for Aretha? What was it that "they" used to call it on the radio? Oh yaah, "gut-bucket soul." Mercy!!!
  • Robin from Bolton, United KingdomDon Covay (with Booker T/Stax/Blues Brothers guitar star Steve Cropper) was co-writer of Aretha's 1968 single See Saw.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyThe great jazz organist Jimmy Smith did a cover version of this song in 1968; it made Billboard's Top 100, but just barely, it peaked at No. 100 and stayed there for two weeks...
  • Greg from Price, UtCover all you want, but Aretha's version can never be touched. Guitarist Joe South had several hits of his own, including "Walk a Mile in My Shoes" and the Grammy-winning "Games People Play" (not to be confused with the Spinners' 1975 Top Five hit).
  • Faye from New Bern, NcThis is one of my all time favorite songs. Also the movie "Michael" is wonderful. I never watch it without tears. ~^-.-^~
  • Kimmie from Dallas, GaI adore this song! This is wonderful for improv musical preformances.
  • Steve from Gaithersburg, MdA great cover version of this song was done for the 1991 movie "The Commitments".
  • Ron from Bentonville, ArThis was also featured in 1990's Sneakers, a great computer thriller with great music.
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