Everybody Lost Somebody

  • This introspective song was inspired by the loss of Jack Antonoff's younger sister in high school. The Bleachers main man shared his inspiration for the track in a lengthy post on social media:

    "As you know if you've been listening to my music for a bit I lost my sister when I was 18. That in some way informs everything I do and everything I write. This song is a massive shift and a statement for what Gone Now is because it's the first time I feel conversational about this loss and not just here to document it. That's something I could have never imagined in the past but is the heart and soul of my new work and why I felt that I had something worth releasing."

    Antonoff added: "Maybe it's partially the age I'm - at right on this cliff of actual adulthood - but I started to see people dragging all their pain around. It's like we all have a suitcase. No amount of money or luck can get you to move through life without this big suitcase you have to lug around. We don't want to carry too much - then it would be impossible to keep moving, we don't want to empty too much out - then we wouldn't be ourself."

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